r/agedlikemilk May 26 '22 Helpful 5 Wholesome 1 Take My Power 1

10 years later...

Post image
56.1k Upvotes

u/MilkedMod Bot May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

u/radiatia has provided this detailed explanation:

This is a screenshot of a video in which Elon Musk claims he will send someone to Mars in 10 years. Underneath the video we see that it was posted 10 years ago. There are currently no confirmed humans on Mars and from thence the humour arises.


Is this explanation a genuine attempt at providing additional info or context? If it is please upvote this comment, otherwise downvote it.

→ More replies

2.2k

u/lookoutnow May 26 '22 Wholesome

Matt Damon. 2015.

359

u/the_messiah_waluigi May 26 '22

Closest we'll get to putting people on Mars so far.

111

u/El_cid_ingles May 26 '22 Silver

Elon was misunderstood; what he said was: “I’ll put a man in ma’arse in ten years”

31

u/yeswecann May 27 '22

And it only took 10 minutes

→ More replies
→ More replies

402

u/commander_nice May 26 '22

That was fake. It was made in a movie studio to make the Russians think we made it to Mars. The technology or funding to get a man to Mars didn't exist in 2015.

382

u/wayfarout May 26 '22 Table Slap

You conspiracy theorists are nuts. Matt Damon insisted on filming on location.

79

u/commander_nice May 26 '22

There's no way it really happened. Explain how the wind knocked over the thing that stranded Matt Damon on Mars. You can't because the wind on Mars is too weak. It must have been filmed on Earth where the winds are strong enough. Moreover, Donald Glover does not and has never worked as an employee at NASA. He's an actor.

67

u/Crathsor May 26 '22

Well... he pretends to be an actor. But how could we know for sure? Actors are professionals at pretending.

24

u/peoplesen May 26 '22

Circular perfection

4

u/NullPro May 27 '22

11/10 comment

→ More replies

22

u/cutthemalarky87 May 26 '22

The real question is how did Harry, Lloyd's best friend, get fired from a dog grooming service called mutt cuts and then end up the director of NASA. That's some serious resume building.

→ More replies
→ More replies

128

u/PenguinWithAglock May 26 '22

This is true! Mat always films on location. My great-grandpa used to talk about how surprised they were in Ramelle when the time machine portal opened up and the film crew stepped out to shoot “Saving Private Ryan”

24

u/ManInADarkAlley May 26 '22

My kind of humor.. Take my updoot

→ More replies

5

u/wayfarout May 26 '22

Spielberg is a fucking genius.

9

u/ClockworkNinjaSEA May 26 '22

This entire thread sounds like a Bojack Horseman bit (the non-depressive ones) and I love it!

4

u/Marquetan May 26 '22

The snail wrangler on set had nothing but great things to say about him!

Oh wait, that was Ben Affleck, never mind.

→ More replies

23

u/Superfluous_Thom May 26 '22

The technology or funding to get a man to the Moon didn't exist in 1969

This talking point is my favorite because it's kind of true. We didn't have the technology to do it, and we in many ways still don't. The sheer amount of fundamental mathematics and physics that went into overcoming the still present engineering shortfalls is fucking incredible.. They Strapped a tin can to a bomb and put that motherfucker on the moon, THEN flew back... It truly is one of humanities greatest achievements that we were able to do it with the tools we had at the time.

10

u/Ok-Swordfish2723 May 26 '22

Right? And especially now with the availability of computers it is hard to fathom that any smart watch has more processing power than the onboard computers of Apollo.

5

u/Superfluous_Thom May 26 '22

You also have to consider the limitations brought forth by "the rocket equation".

Rocketry does not scale, so while the saturn V was fucking insane, it's not like they they were going to just keep on making bigger and bigger rockets until they succeeded. At some point you lose efficiency. So even with theoretically infinite dollars streaming in through Washington, money (and hence a theoretically infinitely large rocket) was never going to completely solve the problem... Pure number crunching and science did. It's amazing, really.

3

u/Ok-Swordfish2723 May 26 '22

Soviets tried it and got a gigantic crater for their trouble!

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

16

u/Kerao_cz May 26 '22

Not true. They were afraid that Russia and China might find out that it's a fake so they filmed it on Mars to make it look more believable.

12

u/FavelTramous May 26 '22

I can’t believe you’re saying the mars landing was fake. They documented the entire thing and even had to rescue the guy afterwards.

→ More replies

14

u/ibelieveinufos May 26 '22

Mmmmmaaaaaatt Daaaammon

8

u/TheFlyingN1mbus May 26 '22

That’s all I ever hear in my head whenever I’d see Matt Damon’s name. Damn Team America… why you gotta always be in my head!

5

u/Michael90_Denmark May 26 '22

That always needs to be saved. Wasting out tax-paid money...

5

u/DickMille May 26 '22

Christ, that was 7 years ago?

→ More replies

4

u/Hawaiian_Brian May 26 '22

fortune favors the brave

→ More replies

2.7k

u/Grand_Protector_Dark May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

Honestly anyone who actually listenes to musks overly ambitious timelines, just only has themself to blame.

Anyone with any reasoning could have seen this coming

725

u/Big_Burg May 26 '22

Or even the projects themselves. Hyperloop anybody?

378

u/Grand_Protector_Dark May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

The engineering probably can be made to work.

Is it practical or needed? Not at all.

Honestly there's the half backed thought that musk tried to use it as excersise for a potential Mars base, then quickly threw it under the rug when it turned out more complex than initially thought.

426

u/Lyndon_Boner_Johnson May 26 '22

The engineering probably can be made to work.

Yes, we’ve known how to dig tunnels for a while now.

182

u/Shai-hodl May 26 '22

But do they have rgb? NOOOO

26

u/Inflatableman1 May 26 '22

real good beer?

13

u/SnortTradeSleep May 26 '22

They better have it. It will keep a lot of people happy when they get stuck in a claustrophobic underground traffic jam

7

u/secretsecrets111 May 26 '22

No, you dummy. It's Ruth Gader Binsberg.

→ More replies

8

u/Shai-hodl May 26 '22

Jesse what are you even talking about ?

10

u/Electrical-Swing-935 May 26 '22

Words start with letters and sometimes can be made to fit acronyms that are not what those acronyms mean

9

u/Psion87 May 26 '22

Not to be prescriptivist, I'm just dropping this because I think it's interesting, but the "proper" definition of "acronym" only fits when you pronounce it like a word, like POTUS or NASA. When you spell it out, like FBI or CPU, it's (again, technically) an initialism, so RGB would be an initialism

Obviously that's not how people tend to use the word "acronym," and in my experience, people tend not to use "initialism" basically at all, but I think it's neat

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

115

u/leshake May 26 '22

Yes but why use trains when you can use cars!

taps head

123

u/Lyndon_Boner_Johnson May 26 '22

And imagine for a moment, if you could somehow link all of these cars in such a way that they all stop and go at the exact same time, preventing the build up of stop and go traffic. Crazy I know. But I’m sure they’ll solve it with like AI…or something.

53

u/Uwotm8675 May 26 '22

And what if we used some sort of material with a low coefficient of friction for the wheels...no that's probably crazy too.

50

u/jkst9 May 26 '22

Maybe to increase speed we could make the wheels a special shape to fit in spots in the road which also removes the need to turn while driving... But that's insane

21

u/fezzuk May 26 '22

Perhaps then if they are also made of a conductive material you could deliver power through them removing the need for heavy and expensive batteries.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

32

u/herkyjerkyperky May 26 '22

To Elon, the flaw with trains or buses is that you need to share space with other people. He doesn't like that and that is reflected on how he thinks about transportation. He doesn't care about efficiency or anything else, he just doesn't want to share space with other people.

→ More replies
→ More replies

77

u/DunsparceIsGod May 26 '22

And we've also known for decades that tunnels should be wide enough to actually be able to leave the vehicle in case of emergency, but apparently Musk didn't get the memo

24

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

19

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

9

u/sergei1980 May 26 '22

He is really into phallic objects for some reason.

→ More replies

18

u/ShittyMcFuck May 26 '22

Luckily any electric cars with bigass batteries have never had any issues like that. Nosiree

→ More replies

15

u/Revolutionary_Leg152 May 26 '22

Thank god Tesla's aren't known to spontaneously combust

→ More replies
→ More replies

9

u/kazador May 26 '22

Mining engineer here. There is a reason tunnels are expensive. If he truly would have been able to drill tunnels that cheap it would revolutionize the whole mining industry. And mining tunnels are cheap when compared to rail tunnels.

→ More replies
→ More replies

86

u/sth128 May 26 '22

No the engineering required to make Hyperloop work is not practical and the concept presents extreme safety concerns.

It is next to impossible to have a negative pressure tunnel that can withstand the elements, temperature fluctuations, man made impacts, other unknown dangers, while having safety escapes and achieve economic parity, let alone profit.

Hyperloop will never happen before we discover room temperature superconducting material that's cheaper than plastic.

38

u/--dontmindme-- May 26 '22

I don’t even understand why hyperlooop would be needed, what’s wrong with maglev or tgv technology and speed?

94

u/Nowhereman123 May 26 '22

You see, Elon Musk needs to keep announcing these overly ambitious, pseudo-futurist vaporware vanity projects to keep the public convinced he's actually contributing some kind of positive change to society.

28

u/--dontmindme-- May 26 '22

Yeah that part I guess I understand, the guy is a useless vanity project buffoon.

40

u/Nowhereman123 May 26 '22

He's a trust fund baby cosplaying as some genius philanthropist inventor type and only proposes this shit to stroke his own ego.

34

u/GroundhogExpert May 26 '22

Let me add just a little flavoring to your main course, notice that almost all of Musk's plans involve him not being subject to sitting in traffic. hyperloop, passenger rockets, tunnels that zip individual cars around, ev personal vertical-takeoff jets, they're all proposals that conveniently allow Musk to bypass all the peasants stuck in traffic. Not to mention his failed projects like solar city, where he built a fake town and lied about solar panel roofs, then used Tesla's investors' money to bail out solar city (there is a lawsuit currently underway for this, btw). The guy sucks, he didn't found Tesla, he was kicked out of paypal for being useless, and now we know he has weird curved dick. He's a fucking joke.

15

u/Nowhereman123 May 26 '22

I like how the obvious answer to the traffic problem is just stuff like public transit and trains, but he doesn't like those cause you might have to look at a stinky poor on them.

→ More replies

5

u/hey_listen_hey_listn May 26 '22

How do we know he has weird curved dick?

→ More replies

5

u/SidewaysFancyPrance May 26 '22

He loves the reaction he gets when he makes these promises, and nobody ever holds him to them when they never materialize. He's another grifter that's created a cult.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/AJRiddle May 26 '22

The appeal is that they claim Hyperloop technology would be about double the speed of the current fastest high speed rail/maglev.

I haven't heard anything about how to make high speed rail go anywhere that fast without a vacuum tube. Doesn't mean it's a great idea or feasible in reality, but the speed is the appeal

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

11

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

some dudes a lot smarter than me said there are problems with the design of hyperloops making them less viable.

→ More replies
→ More replies

148

u/dancingcuban May 26 '22

I think he’s been saying Teslas would be “Fully autonomous in 2 two years” since 2017.

30

u/NessaMagick May 26 '22

That line is extremely important, too. It's not just overpromising to make money - his constant promise that "by the end of next year we'll have self driving cars" is literally halting progress because governments take a wait-and-see approach with things like public transport or bike infrastructure.

9

u/doorMock May 26 '22

He said people would be insane not to buy the Model 3 because they will be used as Robotaxis in 2020.

6

u/Rajareth May 26 '22

Everything I’ve been seeing online is about how it’s poorly assembled and replacement parts are astronomically expensive. Sorry-not-sorry Musk, gonna stick with my Honda hybrid.

3

u/bankrollwerollin May 26 '22

you are so unimaginably delusional if you think that is why the governments aren't putting money into public infrastructure lol

i cannot stand redditors or the people who make or upvote comments like these

→ More replies
→ More replies

34

u/proxlamus May 26 '22

Came here to say the same. I bought my Tesla in May 2017 expecting the full release in August. So wrong. So very very wrong

18

u/Dag-nabbitt May 26 '22

If you live in an old city like Boston, with roads like this, you'll know that self-driving cars are decades away at best.

4

u/Illustrious_Car_7394 May 26 '22

The real question is whether lidar/ML can prevent them from getting Storrowed.

3

u/justarandom3dprinter May 26 '22

Last I heard I'm pretty sure they cut lidar due to price so I don't they'll have FSD for a long long time now

→ More replies
→ More replies

8

u/daynighttrade May 26 '22

I don't think you're alone. Lots of people bought into that hype and making money via Robotaxis.

7

u/Darkon-Kriv May 26 '22

If you believe they would sell robo taxis to people instead of just using them you deserve to get scammed. If I have something that will pay itself off quickly I'll just take the profit for myself why would they sell it to you for cheap.

4

u/fezzuk May 26 '22

Naa they could do it and here's how and why. (Assuming they ever get full auto working)

Will have to pay a subscription service to use the robot taxi optional extra, all payments will go via tesla that will hang on to the money for as long as possible to keep the interest and a TBC % of sales.

Maintenance of the vehicle will be the responsibility of the owner of course, and there will be a lot more wear and tear with the car basically operating 24/7.

Maintenance of course can be only done at offical (and expense) tesla Maintenance centres, if the vehicle is found to be "tampered with" anywhere else then you lose all privileges of any subscription with tesla.

Including the taxi service option, self driving option, of course this is done all for public safety.....

This way tesla basically get a fleet of robot taxis, that someone else paid for, someone else pays them to maintain, and keeps people hooked into their service ego system.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

15

u/godplaysdice_ May 26 '22

They can't even figure out how to get cruise control working safely so forget about FSD. Cruise control is completely unsafe to use on my commute because of phantom braking.

→ More replies

39

u/Pons__Aelius May 26 '22

He has also been promising full autonomous driving in Teslas is one year away every year since 2014.

→ More replies

62

u/osuisok May 26 '22

The NYT put out a new documentary of him on Hulu recently and it’s pretty eye opening.

In one part, they show multiple clips of Elon saying that Tesla is only 2 years away from full self driving capabilities. Every two years, he says they just need two more years and people eat it up.

To this day, there is not true full self driving in a Tesla - the driver must keep their hands on the wheel and attention engaged at all times.

11

u/Sensitive_Speech4477 May 26 '22

He's the bruno caboclo of self driving cars. He's 2 years away from being 2 years away.

→ More replies

5

u/guardian87 May 26 '22

Mercedes also started real level 3 driving recently which is much more advanced than what Tesla does and still not full self driving in every possible situation.

→ More replies
→ More replies

57

u/carfniex May 26 '22

"overly ambitious timelines" means lying

→ More replies

16

u/frubano21 May 26 '22

This is the same man quoted as saying something along the lines of “try to make your 10year plan happen in 6months; you’ll probably fall short but you’ll have gotten a lot further than you initially thought you could.” Don’t get me wrong I love that quote, but by my estimations if he said 10 years it’ll be more like 200+ years

→ More replies

12

u/Fa1c0n3 May 26 '22

Honestly anyone who actually listenes to musks just only has themself to blame.

Fixed it.

11

u/MaterialCarrot May 26 '22

Not to mention the fact that, while he hasn't gotten to Mars in 10 years, he's led a revolution in space flight design and delivery. If anything that's more impressive than plunking a meat bag on a big dead rock for a few weeks (or eternity).

→ More replies

8

u/suspended1134 May 26 '22

I remember him saying they would have 1 million self driving taxis on the road by the end of the year in 2020

5

u/McDreads May 26 '22

Didn’t nasa say they’d have the Artemis program on the moon by 2024?

10

u/this_is_my_new_acct May 26 '22

NASA's goal was 2028, then Trump forced a move back to 2024 so it could take place under his, presumed, second term.

The Trump administration’s target of 2024 human landing was not grounded in technical feasibility -NASA Administrator, Bill Nelson

Pretty much as soon as Trump was out of office and the dust settled, NASA reverted back to "no earlier than 2025".

Then there was that 7 month delay while the courts ordered work stoppage due to Jeff Bezos suing after losing a proposed contract.

TLDR: NASA has 6.5 years before we can claim any failure on their estimates.

4

u/restlessboy May 26 '22

Delays are the standard in aerospace. They are so ubiquitous that they're literally assumed by everyone in the industry. Nobody actually thought SLS was going to have its first launch in 2016.

Setting a goal of 10 years means they aim for a 10 year timeline and hope that in reality the delays keep it under ~20 years. But nobody cares about that because it's Elon Musk and everything he does has to be bad

5

u/PM_ME_UR_DINGO May 26 '22

Science is a liar sometimes.

https://youtu.be/U3Ak-SmyHHQ

People in this thread complaining about not meeting a deadline invalidating anything are unironically Mac.

→ More replies
→ More replies

10

u/Sharp-Floor May 26 '22

Musk timelines are pretty funny.
 
The other side of that coin is you don't bet against them actually doing these things, eventually. I remember quite a few times where people laughed and said the things they were going to do are absurd. Sometimes even insisting they're impossible. Then watched them do it.
 
tldr; I won't be surprised when SpaceX puts people on Mars. I just know better than to pay attention to Musk's timelines for anything.

→ More replies

8

u/Oldjamesdean May 26 '22

He may not have put people on Mars however he did make those badass reusable rockets that can auto-land and that's some serious sci-fi shit there...

→ More replies
→ More replies

560

u/Wurzelgemuese May 26 '22 Wholesome

Quote from a recent Interview: At SpaceX we specialise at converting the impossible to late.

81

u/MaritMonkey May 26 '22 Wholesome

48

u/Tankh May 26 '22

"Better late than impossible"

→ More replies

20

u/Leggi11 May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

why does a reddit link take me to safari, then asks me if I want to open it in the app and sends me to the app store, I press open and then proceeds to not show me the content of the link??

Edit: Thanks for the suggestions! I will try and see if I manage to not revert to the reddit app :)

10

u/GRik74 May 26 '22

The official Reddit app is decent most of the time, but it has some quirks that are seriously annoying. I’d recommend getting a 3rd party app. I use Apollo but there’s several others and they’re all free as far as I’m aware. They’re not exactly perfect but they’re miles better than the official app (IMO).

3

u/Leggi11 May 26 '22

yes thanks. I dont know but this issue only started like 3 days ago. I have apollo but I find myself using the normal app again all the time

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

74

u/nighthawk_something May 26 '22

That's actually really funny and clever.

→ More replies

83

u/Sharp-Floor May 26 '22

I'll take it.
 
We're very used to, "twenty years past projections and a trillion dollars over budget before the program gets killed." Late is a huge improvement.

52

u/ATXBeermaker May 26 '22

What project got killed after being a trillion dollars over budget? NASA's track record is phenomenally successful, and with a fraction of the budget they deserve.

40

u/restlessboy May 26 '22

Nothing at NASA has ever been a trillion dollars over budget; that person was using hyperbole, I think.

But the glacial pace and horrible inefficiency of NASA is pretty well acknowledged in the industry. They have the most brilliant men and women in the world who absolutely love space and want to explore it, but unfortunately, they still have to take orders from politicians and all their special interest groups and lobbyists.

For example, Constellation- a program developed under the Bush administration- was cancelled in 2010 after spending $12 billion for essentially nothing. It was already $3.1 billion over budget.

The current NASA human spaceflight architecture, the Space Launch System, started development in 2011. It was slated to launch in December 2016. It has not yet launched. It has already cost over $23 billion- more than twice its initial cost estimate- and hasn't even gone to orbit yet.

Starship, meanwhile, has cost somewhere in the ballpark of $5 billion and is slated to go to orbit later this year. It has been in serious development for only about three years. It also is larger than SLS, uses a completely new engine design with FFSC (full-flow staged combustion), is entirely reusable (the SLS launcher is expendable), and has already had successful static fires and flight tests.

6

u/filipehenrique May 27 '22

I do want to call out - this is largely due to the cost-plus contract system that basically means the contractors (private corporations like Boeing) are incentivized to drive up costs and delay delivery as long as possible to maximize profit.

Notably, SpaceX doesn’t do this. They have likely saved taxpayers millions if not billions of dollars compared to if they didn’t exist and we had to use the old legacy ways of doing things.

People like to harp on Elon and his timelines and companies but SpaceX has made huge contributions in space travel in both cost reduction and capability. There is literally no other company or country on the planet right now that has landed and reused orbital rocket boosters as much as SpaceX has and driven down the cost of launching to orbit as much as they have.

Elon, and his team of engineers, deserve recognition for working to achieve what everyone said was impossible.

5

u/SaggyCaptain May 27 '22

Whoever came up with cost plus contacts needs to be shot. I despise working on those projects, they're just soulless.

→ More replies
→ More replies

17

u/The_Final_Ka-tet May 26 '22

As I just said to someone yesterday, you can't fund NASA to the tune of pennies on the dollar vs what they need AND complain that they haven't accomplished anything noteworthy in terms of major exploratory ventures like manned missions to Mars or similar. But that seems to be the reality of what I've witnessed in public opinion over the last decade or so.

7

u/Zacous2 May 26 '22

But SLS is such a monument to NASA's failure? It's cost a vast amount and taken years compared to SpaceX doing it with less infrastructure.

→ More replies
→ More replies

8

u/ohnoyoudidnt21 May 26 '22

Obviously not a trillion but:

SLS James Webb Starliner

Just to name a few off the top of my head. Space is hard, can’t blame NASA, but SpaceX does it better.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/infamouszgbgd May 26 '22

Clever slogan, I would like to compliment whoever Elon Musk stole it from.

10

u/concorde77 May 26 '22

If that doesn't sum up aerospace engineering in one sentence, I don't know what will.

→ More replies

535

u/Snowf1ake222 May 26 '22 Helpful

Also Elon Musk: "If WFP can describe on this Twitter thread exactly how $6B will solve world hunger, I will sell Tesla stock right now and do it."

137

u/Connect-Current-80 May 26 '22

Was it described? I remember his statement but didn't follow

329

u/LVL15_Spice_Paladin May 26 '22

Yes. Keep in mind wfp never made a claim that $6b would end world food hunger, that was a claim made by a newspaper reporting on wfp’s famine program. Wfp explained that to elon and showed him what the money was for and elon never paid up.

22

u/[deleted] May 26 '22 edited 24d ago

[deleted]

→ More replies

112

u/daynighttrade May 26 '22

And media surely like to suck his di. There was so much report that Elon will give away money, but no reporting following it when wfp came back with response. Fu media.

9

u/apokrovskiy May 26 '22

Off topic, but why even use swear words just to go through the effort of censoring them yourself? Its a bit cringy

→ More replies
→ More replies

33

u/Sea_Chocolate9166 May 26 '22

This one ☝️

→ More replies

37

u/JoeSicko May 26 '22

They had a plan. He did not follow through on it.

94

u/Pavol_lovaP May 26 '22

Plan was basically buy a lot of food and give it to people in need. Sure it’s a good idea but it definitely doesn’t end world hunger. Also he asked for transparency on spendings which they couldn’t produce.

Edit : I just wanted to clarify, I’m not saying one is right or wrong here.

51

u/Teesh13 May 26 '22

That's a bit misleading.

Here's an article that goes over the timeline. Within 2 weeks of Musk's tweet, WFP provided the requested details, and Musk suddenly became silent on the topic. (It also brings up how the goal was to end famine for 42 million people for at least one year, not to end world hunger as a whole which it keeps getting spun into).

And here is the WFP info. Just over half of the money was to be used on the immediate need for a 1 year supply of food (including last-mile transportation). The rest of the money was to stimulate local market economies, increase existing infrastructure for farming and agriculture, and set up logistics / global trade programs.

→ More replies

21

u/BraveGrape May 26 '22

I'm not sure who gave that summary to you, that's a horrible summary, the 6B was for a specific cause not to solve world hunger forever, absolutely no one believes world hunger is that cheap. Take a look:

https://twitter.com/WFPChief/status/1454918748817739779?t=CUpO5THlhCeA_D0dNjW5zw&s=19

https://www.wfp.org/stories/wfps-plan-support-42-million-people-brink-famine

Also, it appears their documents are on their website, just a few minutes on their website got me their executive report for 2021 and a released internal audit:

https://www.wfp.org/publications/annual-evaluation-report-2021

Or you can look around in.

https://executiveboard.wfp.org/

No judgement but try to verify things like this before posting them, you seem like an educated person but I know time is limited to verify everything we hear, but when you're about to post it's the perfect time to reevaluate your position.

16

u/LVL15_Spice_Paladin May 26 '22

People here just fell for elons attempt at discrediting the wfp and don’t even realize it.

4

u/BraveGrape May 26 '22

I can't blame them, I actually heard the false version of the story first from a tech news YouTube channel I used to subscribe to.

Musk is such a weird figure in that in-between his hyping/grifting there are a bunch of medium-size grifters who attach their success to his, and then little grifters attached to medium ones and so on. Then at the bottom you have NFT owners who are desperate to sell, or the coin market who could really use some liquidity.

Every step in the pyramid benefits from hyping him up, so you have a lot of these reasonably popular channels embellishing his image without his involvement whatsoever, because it then by association makes them look good, and suddenly that coin is a little more trustworthy. Take that to the logical opposite, and you'll see why so many jump in his defense if you insult him.

Grifters will grift, and sometimes people fall for it. We really can't filter and verify everything we take in, it's impossible, but you can and should filter and verify what's coming out.

6

u/LVL15_Spice_Paladin May 26 '22

Also elon is government funded, let’s have him be this transparent with his accounting.

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

21

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

6

u/EvadingTheDayAway May 26 '22

$40 billion to Ukraine! We could’ve solved world hunger 6 times over.

5

u/serious_sarcasm May 26 '22

A stable Ukraine would do a lot to end the world hunger that's about to come.

→ More replies

73

u/jlrick98 May 26 '22

He also wanted completely transparent accounting. They never agreed to that.

25

u/Sea_Mango_4031 May 26 '22

He really ought to do his due diligence before he makes these claims and offers. He makes an offer, and after accepted, always adds in these qualifying conditions. He needs to start with his conditions upfront.

15

u/jlrick98 May 26 '22

That was upfront ...

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

53

u/JmTrad May 26 '22

$6B can only solve world hunger today. Tomorrow they will need more $6B.

14

u/WhiskyAtNoon May 26 '22

Just print more money??

Inflation? Just don't tell anybody you printed more.

→ More replies
→ More replies

105

u/edillcolon May 26 '22

Space is hard. The most common issue is technology development and timelines. This year the Cape was packed back to back with launches, though. Which is a good thing that a ton of missions got to fly.

→ More replies

5

u/ViC_tOr42 May 26 '22

If he meant 10 martian years then its almost 19 years

→ More replies

158

u/the_messiah_waluigi May 26 '22

I swear to fucking God that I am not a Musk fanboy when I say this: timelines with space schedules are pretty much guaranteed to get delayed. NASA's own SLS rocket was supposed to get launched in 2016, and I was expecting that Musk's own rocket would be delayed considering the amount of engineering going into it.

114

u/Ermo May 26 '22

He didn't even say what is being quoted. He said:"Best case 10 years, worst case 15 to 20 years" https://youtu.be/IiPJsI8pl8Q?t=838

19

u/SvanseHans May 26 '22

!remindme 10 years

→ More replies

34

u/StarManta May 26 '22

In fairness to OP they're definitely not hitting the 15 to 20 years either. They might be sending cargo to Mars by that time, absolutely will not be sending humans by then.

In fairness to SpaceX, the things they are actually doing are bonkers and were thought to be basically impossible until SpaceX started doing them. In a recent interview Musk said "We specialize in converting 'impossible' to 'late'" and he is not wrong about that.

→ More replies
→ More replies

63

u/Carp8DM May 26 '22

1961 - we're going to the moon in 10 years.

1969 - oops, we meant 8 years.

40

u/the_messiah_waluigi May 26 '22

Kennedy did say by the end of the decade.

19

u/Carp8DM May 26 '22

He beat that by 1 year.

Pretty fucking good.

00 is the end of the decade...

27

u/the_messiah_waluigi May 26 '22

Really fucking good. I wish NASA still had that public support and funding that they had in the 60s and 70s.

6

u/Mr_YUP May 26 '22

The budget it had back then was essentially a war time budget as it was more or less a proxy war with the Russians. We had 4% of the GDP of the county going to fund NASA to get to the moon. It was like $600 Billion in todays money to do that. We can't justify that much money being spent on a single project anymore that isn't a proxy war.

9

u/Carp8DM May 26 '22

Big government works as long as it's held accountable via democratic means.

It's a shame the USA has lost it's way.

→ More replies

5

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

3

u/JayCDee May 26 '22

Yeah, 10 years was stupidly ambitious, but you can't say space X hasn't been getting shit done pretty damn fast all things considered.

→ More replies
→ More replies

298

u/woolypully May 26 '22

To be fair, he got sidetracked calling people pedos, making awful business decisions, and showing he is actually an awful person.

113

u/OhNoManBearPig May 26 '22

How is he supposed to help people when he's so busy pumping and dumping doge and Twitter to take money from people?

→ More replies

5

u/egotisticalstoic May 26 '22

Imagine being the richest person on the planet and then some random on Reddit decides you make awful business decisions xD

→ More replies

28

u/FalconMasters May 26 '22

I also want to make bad business decisions and be the richest man in the world.

34

u/pagerussell May 26 '22 edited May 26 '22

It's really easy, actually. Just be born to rich parents who own a diamond emerald mine.

28

u/The-link-is-a-cock May 26 '22

Wasn't a diamond mine, it was an apartheid emerald mine that he lies and says that no money came from it while his father says he gave Elon money from it and he doesn't know why Elon lies about it. So, long story short it's slave labor money

→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies
→ More replies

127

u/Jockelson May 26 '22

Musk 10 years ago: "I'll put a man on Mars in 10 years."

Musk now: "gonna buy Twitter to own the libs, lol"

36

u/Carp8DM May 26 '22

Well, I would have bought Twitter, but jeez... Twitter is so lame.

Just know I could have bought them. I just chose not to.

(Everyone has had a friend like Elon. He was the biggest douche of the group)

→ More replies
→ More replies

79

u/Sk1pperprod May 26 '22

to be fair he's definitely gotten closer after 10 years

→ More replies

28

u/ioncloud9 May 26 '22

To be fair… their colossal rocket that’s designed to take people to mars is going to fly it’s first test flight in a couple of months. For a fair comparison, compare his timelines of space activities to those of Nasa or Boeing or every single presidential administration since JFK. You think his statements are like a prophecy or something you purchased on kickstarter.

4

u/PM_ME_CRYPTOCURRENCY May 26 '22

There's a weird pattern around Musk, back in 2012 or whatever before the Model S had launched, and before they had landed a Falcon, there were valid criticisms that he couldn't deliver. But now that he's got the most valuable car company on earth, and arguably the most advanced space program, people are using the same criticisms, and they don't make sense.

He can deliver. And honestly, I think he has to say aggressive timelines out loud, even if his internal estimates are better. Because of Parkinson's law. Just look how long the FAA environmental review is taking, they wouldn't even be started if he hadn't announced a launch date 6 months ago.

→ More replies
→ More replies

55

u/dml03045 May 26 '22

I wish he’d climb into one of his rockets and fuck off to Mars.

6

u/PotatoesAndChill May 26 '22

He literally plans to do so. His goal is, and I quote, "to go to Mars and die there, just preferably not on impact".

4

u/dml03045 May 26 '22

The sooner the better.

4

u/PotatoesAndChill May 26 '22

I agree. Can't wait to see humans set foot on Mars, and a functional Mars colony would really put us into the realm of science fiction. It's long overdue.

→ More replies

4

u/TheGardenBlinked May 26 '22

The lack of gravity would fuck with his hair plugs

3

u/trollcitybandit May 27 '22

Did he take a dump in your electric car?

5

u/baxstersbuttons May 26 '22

He could probably still tweet from Mars

→ More replies
→ More replies

107

u/ThatWhiteBoah May 26 '22

Never take a grandiose narcissist to their word

28

u/BradGroux May 26 '22

Especially when the rely on the federal government for approval. They’ve been waiting on FAA approval since mid-2019.

→ More replies
→ More replies

60

u/OutOfCharacterAnswer May 26 '22

If by man he means hair and by mars he means recovering his hair line. Then this was a success!

→ More replies

34

u/lazeedavy May 26 '22

Turns out, it’s a little harder than you think

→ More replies

49

u/lets_fuckin_goooooo May 26 '22

Is it not okay to be ambitious or have goals? Him and the people at spacex made a ton of progress in the past decade

34

u/Chris_Helmsworth May 26 '22

It's astounding to me people would rather look at someone's failures and ignore their successes.

Really bleak outlook.

13

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

[deleted]

→ More replies

4

u/RedditIsAnnoying1234 May 26 '22

I mean this is just such a bad post, all of these things are just goals they set for themselves, but because reddit has such a hate boner for Elon they just upvote anything that shits on him lmao, reddit really is facebook 2.0

→ More replies
→ More replies

7

u/dimechimes May 26 '22

I see this over and over again. How has he made a ton of progress on getting to Mars? LEO being cheaper? The Space Shuttle was ambitious too, and look where that got us.

→ More replies

3

u/BonoboPopo May 26 '22

It is totally fine to have ambitious goals. However he did not formulate it as a goal, but as a plan. On the other hand he gave many people hope, but with no reasonable chance.

It somewhat reminds me of Scott‘s Tots from the Office.

→ More replies

22

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

He’s closer than anyone else....

3

u/Kwiatkowski May 26 '22

well going by typical elon time we’re 10 years out

3

u/JohnyAngelo May 26 '22

He achieved a lot through space X but those time frames were never realistic, which I've always seen more as a PR speak.

3

u/Tight-Lettuce7980 May 26 '22

It's not that he can predict the future. It was an estimation

3

u/prof_mcquack May 26 '22

If a CEO of a small company makes a promise, you’re a fool to believe them unless it’s abundantly clear how they will make money off of your reliance on their promise. The bigger the company, the bigger the fool you are to listen to them.

7

u/bustapr10 May 26 '22

Wouldn't exactly say this aged like milk. SpaceX is making strides every year towards this goal and it does look like they'll eventually make it. No one else is even considering attempting it.

10

u/TuftyShellf May 26 '22

All these Reddit users don’t even realize they just replaced Trump with Musk

→ More replies

22

u/squeamish May 26 '22

It won't be aged like milk for another 10.

"Best case scenario 10 years. Worst case 15-20."

Mars discussion is at 13:50. It's a pretty clickbait-y title, too. Most of the interview is about Tesla.

20

u/FrozenMrPotato May 26 '22

Oh no you provided context to an anti Elon thread on Reddit. Guess you’re a Republican now /s

5

u/Norose May 26 '22

Lol.

People don't understand what best case means, it seems. Best case is "literally nothing goes wrong, we build and test hardware and it works so we move on, there are no setbacks for any reason along the way".

SpaceX recovered from an in-flight launch failure in 2015 and then a pad operations vehicle explosion in 2016. That represented over a year of lost time, which delayed the exponential increase in Falcon 9 launch rates (they've gone from several launches per year to several per month these days, with an average of about 1 launch per week over this year so far). SpaceX went down a few technological rabbit holes before changing gears to focus on better solutions (for example, propulsive capsule landing didn't get much demand from NASA, and SpaceX realized that by the time they got it operational they would be very close to developing their much more capable nect generation of vehicles anyway). There was a pandemic which affected all supply chains as well as mental and physical health. Currently there's a massive geopolitical upheaval over the new russo-ukraine war.

We know SpaceX can move incredibly fast when they have the permissions to do so. We're past a year now since the last Starship prototype flight test due to delays in assessments from the FAA that need to be completed before they can try to launch a full stack. The Raptor engine was very complex and hard to build, so SpaceX developed a full layout redesign and produced the Raptor 2 engine with significantly higher performance and much easier manufacturing in about a year (contrast that to Blue Origin's BE-4 engine which uses the same propellants and a simpler combustion cycle yet took a decade to be deemed flight-ready. Even if you assume BE-4 needs to be more reliable for its first flight than Raptor 2, and you throw in the entire original Raptor development process time, that's still an amazing decrease in required time).

→ More replies
→ More replies

19

u/bitman_moon May 26 '22

OK. Can we take a step back? He is setting very ambitious goals for himself and the companies. Does anyone really believe that the richest self made billionaire will be some normal dude, with realistic expectations? Also, for anyone interested, check out SpaceX progress with Starship, which is the vessel expected to take astronauts to Mars. It’s moving at an insane speed, at a project, that is considered impossibly hard. All away from the politics and your interpretation of his wealth, let’s cut bold engineers and entrepreneurs some slack.

9

u/Mrballbeballin May 26 '22

I don't see anyone hating on NASA because of how late the JWST was

→ More replies

20

u/Zslap May 26 '22

Crazy it took me this long a scroll to fall on a comment that wasn’t out of the ass hatred.

→ More replies
→ More replies

4

u/Ermo May 26 '22

He actually said: "Best case 10 years, worst case 15 to 20 years"

Video of that conversation

16

u/readball May 26 '22

Agree. 10 years didn't work out, but meanwhile

  • he has the best space company

  • he has 1200+ satellites in space, giving wireless internet for everyone on the planet (33 countries and counting) - planned that Starlink revenues to be funding going to Mars

  • is waiting for approval for a year now, they won't let him fly his rocket, because bureaucracy

aaaaaaand a noname armchair rocket scientist is saying that Musk is talking BS. Lol.

6

u/Blikenave May 26 '22

"But, WAHHHHHHHHHHHH WAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH WAAAAHHHHH!"
-Reddit

→ More replies

12

u/budda_belly93 May 26 '22

Oh who's getting closer to it than him?

→ More replies

8

u/SkinnyObelix May 26 '22

Who cares, SpaceX gave space exploration a huge boost, the biggest since JFK's speech. If I can't change the ugly side of Musk I damn as well reward myself with the good. He made decisions that got the space industry and the automotive industry moving in a better direction. I don't care if he just paid the engineers or not, I welcome that part. It's not because he's a piece of shit those things didn't happen.

→ More replies

22

u/jezza__1 May 26 '22 Wholesome

He’s alot closer than Nasa. Or anyone on reddit.

→ More replies

2

u/zainuu163 May 26 '22

15 years

2

u/[deleted] May 26 '22

How long would it take with our current rocket technology to get from here to mars?

3

u/Norose May 26 '22

To go from Earth to Mars takes between 6 and 8 months for a probe (because we don't care about going fast, it's a machine), but a human mission with modern tech would be able to make the transfer in roughly 4 months (trying to go faster quickly gets extremely difficult, because the propellant requirements increase exponentially).

Anyway, call it 5 months to get to Mars. The two planets aling so you can transfer between them roughly every 30 months. That means you get to Mars 5 months after leaving Earth, then you spend 25 months on Mars' surface doing Mars research things, then the transfer window opens again and you launch back to Earth. You arrive back at Earth another 5 months later and in total spend about 3 years away from Earth.

Another way to do a Mars mission is called a short stay architecture, and has a different launch window. I won't go into the details because it's complicated but basically you spend about 1.5 years away from Earth in total (half the time away) and the tradeoff is that all but ~3 weeks of those 18 monyhs is spent in transit. It takes you much longer to get to Mars, you do a quick stay at Mars, and then you have to leave again, and spend another long stretch of time in transit. It's something like 8.5 months to get to Mars, you spend less than 1 month there, then another 8.5 months back. I personally think that this mission style sucks and isn't worth the risk for such a short time on Mars.

Lastly there's a third type of mission called a single-window round trip, but it requires better engines than we have. You leave like 3 months before the normal window opens, and you accelerate to very high speed. You reach Mars after about 2 months in transit. You stay on Mars for two months. You then launch back to Earth at very high speed amd arrive here another two months afterwards. In total you're away from Earth for 6 months and spend 1/3rd of that time on Mars. This mission would be awesome because it would minimize a lot of risk of either spending too much time in space or too much time on Mars, but again has the little drawback that it's impossible with any propulsion technology we currently have or are likely to have any time soon.

Hope this helps to answer your question!

→ More replies

2

u/F0X_ May 26 '22

3 ish years but you have to do it when Earth and Mars are closest.

→ More replies

2

u/DennisPennis_ May 26 '22

Why would you mock this.