r/dataisbeautiful Nov 10 '22

[OC] What are Americans Most Stressed About? OC

13.0k Upvotes

1.7k comments sorted by

2.4k

u/wildfire98 Nov 10 '22

Heh, oh yeah I forgot about MonkeyPox

176

u/madoublet87 Nov 10 '22

It’s from Aug/Sep when it was a much bigger thing for a decent part of the country.

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u/cumshot_josh Nov 10 '22

It helps that a vaccine for that already existed so they were able to respond much faster.

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u/UPPERKEES Nov 11 '22

It also wasn't airborne.

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u/BeforeYourBBQ Nov 10 '22

It did favor a particular demographic.

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u/maakera007 Nov 10 '22

And apparently all of america forgot about climate change.

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u/fastinserter OC: 1 Nov 10 '22

Well, if by "all of America" you mean except for the 61% that find it a significant source of stress like the graphic says.

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u/Devonance Nov 10 '22

It's number 11 on the chart, there are two pictures

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u/pocketjpaul Nov 10 '22

Number 11 doesn’t seems that high when we talk about the event that we are pretty sure will screw us all.

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u/AtomicPickles92 Nov 10 '22

For real, something seems off.

I had flowers in the yard till like a week ago. And I still see bees trying to find stuff on the dead flowers.

I am still seeing green/yellow trees even though most trees are bare.

It was 75 2 days ago and right now it’s 50ish and it’s November.

All of this took place in MA. I’ve been here a few years, but I swear something feels off. Maybe it’s just in my head? That would make me so happy

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u/geekonthemoon Nov 10 '22

I'm in Ohio and the last couple years it's been pretty warm through November and December. Lots of 70 degree days. Way more than I ever remember before. But I would say for the most part after the new year it gets pretty cold and becomes business as usual winter.

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u/txyesboy Nov 10 '22

In DFW here in TX, they have been tracking weather for complete days/months/years dating back to 1899. The average monthly temps have been going up routinely, but more important when you compare them against each other.

For example: the highest avg monthly temp and the second highest monthly temp (Say, July 1980 is highest July, July 2022 is 2nd highest) is within about a degree or so at the most.

In December 2021, the avg temp was 61.3...which was 7.3 degrees warmer than any December in the 123 (to date) recorded Decembers in DFW.

In the same year, we had one of the most hellish ice/snow storms in DFW history as well.

5

u/RiledAstaldo Nov 10 '22

What is the 123?

8

u/yogert909 Nov 11 '22

I really don’t think you going to notice 2 degrees warmer, but it’s enough to melt a significant portion of our glaciers and dry out a lot of places that don’t have a lot of water and increase the damage from tropical storms. That’s how you notice

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u/Beholder84 Nov 11 '22

I lived in Columbus from 2014 to 2020 and I remember Christmas day one year it was 70 degrees outside. Then February rolled around and it hit like -10.

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u/pocketjpaul Nov 10 '22

Well, in France we had August like temperatures no later than two weeks ago. At the very end of October.

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u/blackbasset Nov 10 '22

Germany had a week of 28.5C two weeks ago. This is not normal.

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u/rei_cirith Nov 10 '22

Yeah... The temperature swings way more frequently and more extremely. There's way more disasters related to extreme weather. Everyone is suffering from more seasonal allergies, stronger than before because of the plants having longer/overlapping pollination periods.

I'm pretty shocked it's that far down the list compared to gun violence and mass shootings. Like it seems easy to solve that in comparison, fucking make sure psychos have a harder time getting their hands on guns. Background checks and standardized training requirements?

37

u/Eodai Nov 10 '22

We lost 90+% of snow crab in the bearing sea. How long until that statistic is for a cornerstone species and whole ecosystems are eradicated?

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u/DamionSipher Nov 10 '22

Too late. You want to get really scared really fast just look up how little wildlife there is today compared to 20-50 years ago.

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u/rei_cirith Nov 10 '22

I really don't want to know honestly. Between this and the political squabbling everyone is still using to bury their head in the sand, it's been a pretty depressing couple of years. The movie, "Don't Look Up" pretty much said everything...

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u/Kirstie_Ally Nov 10 '22

I understand that global warming is a problem, but I see almost no one concerned about the ocean being polluted and overfished, which I think is a MUCH more concerning problem than gradual warming imo

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u/DamionSipher Nov 10 '22

The rate of ocean acidification should cause more concern than over fishing/pollution. It is already linked to massive aquatic life kill off at shocking levels and is a direct impact of CO2 emissions.

9

u/MIGsalund Nov 10 '22

The climate crisis and the state of the oceans are intrisically linked.

5

u/inactioninaction_ Nov 11 '22

overfishing is a massive problem but it's much easier for an overfished population to recover than one that was wiped out because the water pH became unlivably low

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u/Shermanator213 Nov 10 '22

I wonder if gun violence would be better called "gun policy".

There's a lot more people concerned over gun laws then there are over gun violence specifically.

Does anyone have a link to the study cited?

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u/aCleverGroupofAnts Nov 10 '22

In the grand scheme of things, the climate issue will cost many more lives than guns will, so that's reason enough for it to be higher in the list

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u/Mournclawed Nov 10 '22

The reason it's probably not higher is a gun will kill you now but climate change is over time so not as much an immediate threat, therefore it's much less stressful to think about climate change.

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u/MIGsalund Nov 10 '22

Unless you have empathy, then thinking about most or all of humanity dying with you seems far worse.

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u/AlexG2490 Nov 11 '22

I don't think that is quite a fair comparison. Just because something is a much more immediate concern doesn't mean you don't care about it.

If I have cancer with an estimate of one year to live, but I have a massive heart attack and am in danger of dying within minutes, the heart attack is what I am concerned with right now.

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u/rei_cirith Nov 10 '22

Even in the face of multiple global disasters (climate, political, medical) people are so ultra focused on their own bubble. So many of the top problems are almost exclusively USA problems that most other first world countries don't have. If people got their heads out of their asses, maybe we'd have those problems solved too so we can focus on bigger problems.

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u/lostgirl11 Nov 10 '22

Yo can you feed the bees please. Just some sugar water for the flight home since they have flower shortages.

Its not their fault 😓

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u/alkakfnxcpoem Nov 10 '22

Also in MA, been here since the early 90s and it is vastly different from when I was a kid. My grandmother has lived here her whole life and frequently mentions just how different the weather is. I remember driving down the cape and her saying she had never seen the water as high as it was in Scituate, which is where she spent every summer as a kid. It's wild.

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u/answeryboi Nov 10 '22

It's 61% on the graph, which makes sense because ignoring climate change has been part of the republican platform for decades.

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u/turkeyfox Nov 10 '22

Not ignoring. Actively misinforming others to benefit fossil fuel companies.

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u/FridgeParade Nov 10 '22

Something seems off? Mate, last time there was this much carbon in the air the planet had forests on Antarctica. Seems off is the understatement of the eon.

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u/InThisBoatTogether Nov 10 '22

There was a heat wave in the Pacific NW which killed hundreds last year, Seattle and Vancouver had temperatures in excess of 100F. These are places without widespread central AC because it's never been necessary

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u/zaminDDH Nov 10 '22

For real, something seems off.

I had flowers in the yard till like a week ago. And I still see bees trying to find stuff on the dead flowers.

I am still seeing green/yellow trees even though most trees are bare.

It was 75 2 days ago and right now it’s 50ish and it’s November.

All of this took place in MA. I’ve been here a few years, but I swear something feels off. Maybe it’s just in my head? That would make me so happy

Same, but Indiana. It's been 75 all week and Saturday the high is 40.

2

u/DubiousChicken69 Nov 10 '22

Still have flowers in my yard in Indiana lol haven't even had a real frost yet this year. Insane.. I haven't even broke out my winter stuff yet and I work outside...

2

u/LanaDelHeeey Nov 10 '22

Idk I’ve lived in the northeast my whole life and that’s pretty normal except for the green trees bit. Haven’t noticed that where I am. Wild temperature swings this time of year on a daily basis is kinda our thing.

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u/AnRealDinosaur Nov 10 '22

You're not wrong. I grew up in MA and we had to design our Halloween costumes around snow suits most years.

2

u/semper_JJ Nov 10 '22

It's a third of the way through November and I'm still going out on calls in short sleeves. I'm still having to keep the windows down in the truck to save gas and not run the ac. In November. I don't know man, I think we're starting to be in some trouble here.

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u/--zaxell-- Nov 10 '22

Half of the top ten are basically duplicates, though, so the thing that's gonna kill us all is actually more like our 7th priority. Yay?

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u/Invideeus Nov 10 '22

Its changes are more subtle so its easier to forget about when you're also worried about wtf your nazi neighbor is doing every day.

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u/Teddy_Icewater Nov 10 '22

It's kind of hard to get stressed out about something that isnt clearly defined or understood and isn't going to really hurt till down the road when there's plenty of other stressors that more directly impact most Americans on the day to day.

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u/ThatHairyGingerGuy Nov 10 '22

The fact that in the second half of your point is that the effects haven't started kind of illustrates the first half of your comment.

We are already seeing some massive impacts of climate change in the form of increased risk of extreme weather and natural disasters, increased global devestation to ecosystems leading to reduced quality of life, increased costs, increased migration and the associated political fears that lead to mass shifts to xenophobic anti immigration policies. This will just continue to get worse as the average global temperature continues to rise.

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u/ForgotMyOldAccount7 Nov 10 '22 Eureka!

That will screw us all... eventually... way down the line. There are much more immediate threats that people are worried about.

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u/vlsdo Nov 10 '22

Except for the people who are dying from it right now. It's almost like it won't affect you until it affects you.

34

u/indebtedStudent031 Nov 10 '22

I mean ya, that's human nature. People worry about issues that are impacting them right now over issues that will impact them in the upcoming years.

It's short sighted, but it's not a surprise either.

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u/fukitol- Nov 10 '22

It's pretty simple when you look at it from the perspective of something like Maslow's hierarchy. Climate change is serious, but it doesn't directly effect my every day life, not in the immediate term anyway. I'm walking out of the grocery store with two bags after spending $100, that's noticeable.

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u/Dumbfault Nov 10 '22

I think a good deal of are convinced the other issues will be the death of us first before climate change kills everybody. It's hard to worry about the broad future when you're too stressed about making it through tomorrow.

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u/CMDR_omnicognate Nov 10 '22

Yeah but it’s not really a obvious or fast moving danger. If florida just sank tomorrow then sure people would probably start caring about it in the US, but compared to things like inflation or violence and shootings, it’s something that’s going to be a problem much later by comparison

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u/lLiterallyEatAss Nov 10 '22

Forgot? We've just been holding our hands over our ears going la la la about it for 40+ years.

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u/carpitown Nov 10 '22

You must not be one of the hypochondriacs polled.

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u/no_good_answers Nov 10 '22

Title is misleading. Should be “What are most Americans stressed out about?”

The data say nothing about differences in the magnitude of stress!

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u/ButtPlugPipeBomb Nov 10 '22

Also, all the bars are out of 83% because that's the highest number, so it's unintuitive visually.

e.g. 62% looks more like 75% with no reference point on the second page.

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u/Existential_Stick Nov 11 '22

What is up with the shit tier graphs in this sub lately? It seems to be a lot worse than usual for some reason.

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u/iamplasma Nov 10 '22 edited Nov 10 '22

The infographic claims it is things people say are a "significant" source of stress, so there is some level of magnitude.

But I have serious doubts about the truth of that. Short of some preposterously bad survey methodology, I can't believe it to be true.

Like, seriously, more than half of Americans are experiencing "significant" stress because of immigration? Almost half because of monkeypox? 73% of people are stressed out about the danger of mass shootings!? That's all absurd.

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u/Existential_Stick Nov 11 '22

Also all of those sound like very cherry picked politician talking points...

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u/FrostyD7 Nov 10 '22

"from a series of preselected options" should also be added. Else people assume that answers not found on this list are not stressful to Americans, rather than neglected entirely in the survey.

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u/1h8fulkat Nov 10 '22

Should be "What public issues are most Americans stressed out about"

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u/Lysol3435 Nov 10 '22

And if it were what they were “most” stressed about, then they should add up to 100%

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u/Wargoatgaming OC: 1 Nov 10 '22

Noone is worried about their own personal debt or their career? Like people care more about Monkeypox?

Seems unlikely.

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u/Kaptonii Nov 10 '22

This was probably a list of things that people either marked as yes or no.

So things that directly effect their lives are not on the list.

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u/foo-jitsoo Nov 10 '22 Wholesome

Oh ok, so this data is just a bunch of random gibberish.

Cool cool.

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u/TheTimeIsChow Nov 10 '22

It absolutely is.

Just look at the topics. 'Personal finances' is probably rolled into 'inflation' but 'future of our nation', 'mid term elections', and '2024 elections' are all stand-alones?

The whole thing reads like family feud topics. Just generated based on what 100 people said rather than being well thought out and categorized.

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u/ErynEbnzr Nov 10 '22

The categorization bugged me too. How are 'crime and violence', 'mass shootings' and 'gun violence' completely separate things?

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u/RobertNeyland Nov 10 '22

How are 'crime and violence', 'mass shootings' and 'gun violence' completely separate things?

You could make a case that there is overlap within the top 10 on the list.

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u/RandomlyConsistent Nov 10 '22

"Personally, I'm OK with gun violence, as long as you don't get greedy and start killing more than 1 at a time"

  • The 2% of respondents between worrying about "Mass Shootings" but not "Gun Violence"

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u/james_the_brogrammer OC: 2 Nov 11 '22

Well, that is unironically what the news media believes based on their coverage of gun violence. Mass shootings make up a drastically disproportionate amount of news coverage compared to the total percent of gun violence that they represent.

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u/royalsanguinius Nov 10 '22

Plus the midterms proved that abortion is clearly a bigger issue for loads of people (particularly women) than anyone actually wanted to admit.

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u/Do_Whatever_You_Like Nov 10 '22

“Future of our nation” was hilarious lmao. An instant sign to not take this seriously in any way.

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u/IrishMosaic Nov 10 '22

That’s like rule number one to make a post on this sub.

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u/IC-23 Nov 10 '22

Except it's not even pretty, it's literally a basic ass bar graph that you can whip up in 10-30 30 minutes

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u/Head-like-a-carp Nov 10 '22

I think inflation might cover ideas of personal debt and perhaps health case too as these effect out of pocket costs.

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u/oh-propagandhi Nov 10 '22

It's meaningful for political influence of voting bases. Unfortunately broad, vague issues have huge impact on getting people to the polls.

"I'm against crime, and I'm not afraid to say it!"

- Bobby Newport

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u/Pakistani_in_MURICA Nov 10 '22

Was there a response option for "just life"?

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u/Repthered Nov 10 '22

Yeah, monkey pox even being on the list is wild to me.

Haven't thought about that since the first few days it was in the news cycle.

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u/Lancaster61 Nov 10 '22

It’s probably implied. Obviously everyone cares about their own personal life the most, so adding it to the survey would be effectively pointless as it’s already obvious.

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u/toney8580 Nov 10 '22

Yea seems like selective polling. That only Old people fill out .

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u/rmprice222 Nov 10 '22

Would that not be under inflation?

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u/pocketdare Nov 10 '22

People watch far too much news for their own well being. Seriously. Over half the things on this list will have absolutely no significant impact on the average person's daily lives. And the majority of the rest will have a much lower impact that you've been led to believe.

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u/BUchub Nov 10 '22

I'm in Illinois. The number of people I hear freaking about the elimination of cash bail that's getting ready to go into effect in January. It's like ya'll don't even live in a neighborhood where this would impact you, are you really fearing for your children?

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u/lazlokovax Nov 10 '22

Or their family.

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u/mrmastermimi Nov 10 '22

data is already 3 months old. so, it's basically useless for the message the OP is trying to give.

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u/gulgin Nov 10 '22

Can I be stressed about misleading graphs? This is a bar chart scaled to a percentage of a percentage… that is just super weird, and notably not beautiful.

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u/BigBeagleEars Nov 11 '22

Man. I just wanna get high and eat bbq

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u/gulgin Nov 11 '22

But if you are eating statistically significant barbecue, aren’t you going to want to be able to graph it in an appropriate way?!

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u/contactdeparture Nov 10 '22 edited Nov 10 '22

This feels like total bs. Need to see survey methodology. The words cannot possibly reflect what average Americans wake up stressed about. Maybe prompted top 10 - pick 2 responses….

[Edit, added all content below]

Also - is there really a sufficiently substantive difference between mass shootings, gun violence, and violence and crime that it captures THREE whole reasons?

Also - there's nothing personal. These are ALL national or global issues.

This just feels like bad research.

So let me answer the question for myself - 1. Job search (I'm in tech, don't cry for me) 2. Home/family considerations 3. Recent massive changes in portfolio value

The problem with surveys like this though, is they influence national debate and political focus, so, bad research does have a downstream impact on our collective lives....

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u/Ogediah Nov 10 '22

Yeah I see a lot of things on that list that anyone I know isn’t concerned with in their day to day life. As examples: monkey pox and gun related questions.

On the flip side, the things that are frequently on people minds and weigh much more heavily are things like the cost of goods, politics around election time, or the impact of racism (particularly for minorities).

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u/bae_con Nov 11 '22

The source for survey methodology is right there in the picture. It's from the American Psychological Association. Here's the poll: https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2022/october-2022-topline-data.pdf

Also - is there really a sufficiently substantive difference between mass shootings, gun violence, and violence and crime that it captures THREE whole reasons?

Mass shootings are a minority of gun violence and gun violence is a minority of violence. So yes, these can all be reasonably separated.

Also - there's nothing personal. These are ALL national or global issues. The article here:

https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2022/10/multiple-stressors-no-function suggests they are specifically looking at uncontrollable external stressors. Stuff like covid and inflation are completely out of an individual's control.

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u/imgrandojjo Nov 10 '22

Inflation is pretty serious business right now. 2 years ago a loaf of bread cost half what it costs now, and wages have not kept pace.

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u/IronGin Nov 10 '22

Good thing you separated violence, gun violence and school shooting.

In my country I'm worried about the economy, money and wages...

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u/whubbard Nov 10 '22

Almost like the was an agenda

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u/antariusz Nov 10 '22

An agenda, in my Reddit? It’s more likely than you’d think.

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u/981032061 Nov 10 '22

“Violence and crime” even though violent crime has been trending sharply down for thirty years.

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u/coolcastform Nov 10 '22

I’m worried about those paper sheets that you can exchange for goods and services.

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u/WM_ Nov 10 '22

Now my climate anxious-ass is even more anxious that climate change is not even in top 10. ffs people!

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u/[deleted] Nov 10 '22

1% of people are concerned about mass shootings but not gun violence?

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u/TheCasualParry Nov 10 '22

It depends on how the data was collected.

If the poll asked a "yes or no" question for every possible stress, then yes.

If the poll asked the participants to rank their worries, then your assumption is not necessarily true.

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u/mikka1 Nov 10 '22

So judging by this, respondents were shown statements in a random order and had to "indicate how significant a source of stress the following is in your life" on a scale of:

c1. Not at all significant

c2. Not very significant

c3. Somewhat significant

c4. Very significant

And this was the list they've apparently been shown:

Climate change/Global warming

Mass shootings

Gun violence in general

Rise in suicide rates

Violence and crime

Increased global tension/conflict

Healthcare

Change in abortion laws

Immigration

The future of our nation

The current political climate

2024 U.S. presidential election

2022 U.S. mid-term elections

The coronavirus pandemic

The racial climate in the U.S.

Inflation

Monkeypox outbreak

I am not a statistician or a survey design pro, but I have serious doubts this methodology is capable of producing real results of what genuinely concerns people and keeps them worried.

The closest thing I can think of is a common Leading objection during the trial when a witness is essentially being led to a specific answer by the examining counsel - this feels the same.

In other words, I genuinely wonder how many people would mention Monkeypox if they are NOT specifically asked about it.

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u/TheCasualParry Nov 10 '22

I would have asked all participants what worried them, and then made them rank it, not give a 1 through 4 score on each one.

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u/merc08 Nov 10 '22

This just screams "survey team brainstormed a list in 10 minutes."

In other words, I genuinely wonder how many people would mention Monkeypox if they are NOT specifically asked about it.

And "monkeypox outbreak" is super vague. Do they mean the current levels of monkeypox impacting the country? Concern for the outcome of catching it at the individual level? Fear of monkeypox becoming a covid-level pandemic? Any given respondent will interpret it differently and we have no way of knowing what they each mean.

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u/mikka1 Nov 10 '22

I hate to nitpick, but the whole thing is vague af, if you ask me.

"Source of stress in my life". Em, how exactly do I measure it? I am not planning a suicide. Strictly speaking, "rise in suicide rates" as a statistical measure per se does not "cause stress" in my daily life at all. Which does not mean I am not worried and tremendously upset about people coming to a suicide as a last resort.

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u/NArcadia11 Nov 10 '22

Most gun violence is either due to domestic violence or located within specific, high-crime neighborhoods. So if you don't have an abusive, gun-owning partner or live in those neighborhoods, the most probable form of gun violence you would face is a mass-shooting. I'm actually surprised the discrepancy isn't higher, but then again it's a "what are you stressed about" chart, not a "what are you most affected by" chart.

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u/aaaa32801 Nov 10 '22

Dude, crossbows are scary.

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u/unripenedboyparts Nov 10 '22

I think a lot of people associate the term "gun violence" with domestic disputes and gang activity. I'd take this to mean people are only concerned about gun violence if it results in mass casualties in a short period time, randomly, in public, and in a "good neighborhood."

People are also biased towards hand guns because they are more likely to be carried for self-defense. This leads to an attitude that "gun violence" in this sense is a necessary evil. I find this is a popular view among many would-be gun reform advocates.

This may not be the actual explanation but it would be very consistent with how a lot of people view gun violence.

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u/RD__III Nov 10 '22

Which is weird, because gun violence is a much bigger issue than mass shootings.

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u/StubbedMiddleToe Nov 10 '22

But a much much smaller issue than healthcare and current political climate, which is what frustrates me.

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u/RD__III Nov 10 '22

I'd certainly agree about healthcare, but would disagree on the political climate. The media industrial complex has overhyped the impending doom of our society, and both parties have hopped along to motivate voters. We aren't going to turn in the Soviet Union or Nazi Germany, no matter what the Republicans and Democrats are trying to spin.

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u/StubbedMiddleToe Nov 10 '22

I interpreted current political climate as "Our representatives are bought and paid for by the folks that the general population needs protection from the most. Also it's all theatre."

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u/RD__III Nov 10 '22

In that case, I'd agree with you.

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u/BLtrading69 Nov 10 '22

No shot 47% of Americans give a rats ass about monkeypox. That was news for maybe a few days

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u/KnoDout Nov 10 '22

Great to know that we actively don't care about education /s

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u/Acheron13 Nov 10 '22

The question was what are people stressed about, not what they care about. The only thing related to education I can see people being stressed about is student loan debt. Since only about 1/3rd of the population even has a 4 year degree, not all of them went into massive debt for their education, and on average college graduates make higher salaries, why would most people be stressed about education?

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u/FoxFourTwo Nov 10 '22

The uneducated typically don't worry about education.

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u/DarkLasombra Nov 10 '22

The most effective way to keep people divided is to convince one side they are better than the other.

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u/scottevil110 Nov 11 '22

Reddit in here doing its part.

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u/exu1981 Nov 10 '22

A sad fact

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u/err0rz Nov 10 '22

Holy small sample group Batman

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u/[deleted] Nov 10 '22 edited 1d ago

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u/DontAskMeForUserName Nov 10 '22

Which ep of family feud is this?

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u/The_Beagle Nov 10 '22

Man if monkeypox is that high the sample makes me dubious haha

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u/djbend01 Nov 10 '22

More people should be afraid of microplastics

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u/poodlebutt76 Nov 10 '22

Sorry my fear is all used up, please try again tomorrow

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u/its_mario Nov 10 '22

We still don't really know what they do.

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u/Soft_Turkeys Nov 10 '22

Im very surprised to see the wealth gap and education aren’t included

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u/Lebrons_fake_breasts Nov 10 '22

I'm afraid that the current unlimited pasta deal at Olive Garden is going away before I get the chance to head over there and eat some.😩

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u/casper5632 Nov 10 '22 Wholesome

Climate change, the crisis that is guaranteed to lead to more deaths than anything on this list, is only number 11.

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u/XxMAGIIC13xX Nov 10 '22

The issue is that something like climate change is a very distant issue in the minds of many people. Something like inflation is definitely more important to the average American especially when you consider that a developed country like the US will likely not have to worry about climate change to the same degree as a Bangladesh or Nigeria. This doesn't even factor in the burden that will be placed in people and the government as a whole to shift to green energy. It's a losing issue.

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u/TheEnviious Nov 10 '22

Which is wild. Thousands of people died in the European heat wave and not a blip on most mainstream news sites.

Tens of thousands of Indians die every year but that doesn't frighten people.

Is it apathy, exhaustion, access to news?

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u/notevenapro Nov 10 '22

Majority of people are going to care about inflation and healthcare before climate change.

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u/InkBlotSam Nov 10 '22

This tracks with how most people deal with their personal lives as well. The foundational, long-view things that are difficult to confront and change - the things that require a hard look in the mirror and tough choices, but that would have unquestionably the greatest impact on our lives - are prioritized really low because we don't want (or necessarily know how) to deal with them and because they cause short-term pain without immediate results, and instead we prioritize stupid, superficial things with immediate feedback that we can easily control.

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u/North_Atlantic_Pact Nov 10 '22

Inflation leads to not being able to buy food and/or shelter, that's a much more immediate concern to some than climate change, and it's incredibly ignorant to refer to it as "stupid, superficial things"

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u/SohndesRheins Nov 10 '22

People are worried about problems that affect them right now, not problems that are 10 or 20 years down the road. If you don't live past this year then why care about climate change?

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u/redundant_ransomware Nov 10 '22

"future of our nation"? What does that even mean??

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u/BBOoff Nov 10 '22

It means "in the big picture, what will America look like in 30 years? 50?"

Will there be a Civil War II? Maybe like the Troubles in Ireland, where Republican and Democrat militias assassinate leaders on the other side?

Will America still be the wealthiest, most powerful nation in the world, or will that mantle be passed to autocrats like Xi Jinping, and what world will they craft to suit their ends?

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u/UseLeading5447 Nov 10 '22

There’s an intelligent response

3

u/iseeapes Nov 10 '22

… where Republican and Democrat militias assassinate leaders on the other side?

Looks like the fringe is already there. I think it’s probably just a matter of time before more competent, organized, and well-funded people take up this approach.

:(

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u/[deleted] Nov 10 '22

[deleted]

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u/aghicantthinkofaname Nov 10 '22

Could be- republicans are trying to chip away at democratic institutions and reverse decades of progress.

Or- democrats are trying to turn the country into a socialist nightmare, taking away what makes America America, and letting in hordes of immigrants, forever altering the character of our nation.

Or possibly even- China.

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u/JBoy9028 Nov 10 '22

That is a very small polling population.

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u/noobgiraffe Nov 10 '22

73% people are worried about mass shooting?

Realisticly speaking chance you're gonna die in mass shooting in US must be astronomically low.

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u/Burt_wickman Nov 10 '22

True but not just people who are killed by mass shootings are affected. It's got a ripple affect a lot like terrorism where the event brings trauma to many more people in the community than who were just bodily injured

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u/RD__III Nov 10 '22

They are astronomically low. But astronomically low chances don't sell newspapers, so you've got to rile up that population and get those dollars rolling in.

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u/ITGuy7337 Nov 10 '22

You have a greater chance of getting hit by lightning or eaten by a shark.

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u/redditaccount71987 Nov 10 '22

Despite the low chance, shootings of all varieties are terrifying to witness. While the chance off mass shootings is low we have not yet done anything about what we believe to be some of the contributing factors or done anything really to tackle other types. The one I saw up close only one person got shot so it doesn't fall into the mass category but they are all still worth tackling.

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u/FB-22 Nov 10 '22

If only there were a way to beam this information into the brains of some of the insufferable Europeans on here who legitimately think every American street and school is a war zone

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u/Brainsonastick Nov 10 '22

I’m concerned with the rate of mass shootings and their impact. I am not the least bit worried that I will be shot myself. My concern is more about the impact on the families and communities they do affect and the psychological impact on kids of regularly reminding them that school shooter drills are necessary now because someone might come into their school and try to kill them.

Personally dying isn’t the only thing one can be concerned about.

That said, I did have a friend who experienced the vegas shooting and a partner who experienced a mass shooting her first day of work. Both suffer PTSD from it. A lot of people know someone or know someone who knows someone who has been affected and seeing that trauma can make them care even if they didn’t before.

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u/brandontaylor1 Nov 10 '22

Cool, the imminent extinction of the human race came in at #11.

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u/oripash Nov 10 '22 edited Nov 10 '22

Climate change not even making the top 9.

Go Murika

Because mass shootings is a threat that can end society and the inability to grow food is not.

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u/Daddywags42 Nov 10 '22

How can 83% be worried MOST about inflation, and 76% be MOST worried about the future of the nation?

This is actually crappy data.

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u/Za_Lords_Guard Nov 10 '22 edited Nov 10 '22

I think 3, 4, 5 are highly influenced by 1, 2, and 8. A lot of the social, political, and economic factors directly increase tension, crime, and violence. Add existential fears over global issues and climate change, and a wonder we aren't all unable to get out of bed and taking pot shots at minor irritants if we do.

I don't know about anyone else, but the past several years have felt like a collective nightmare that no one can manage to wake up from.

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u/HehaGardenHoe Nov 10 '22

7 of the entries are basically duplicates, and this data is before dobbs changed the landscape.

It was worthless to post this, except as a before/after comparison.

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u/hectorjm94 Nov 10 '22

COVID is like 99th on my list of worries.

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u/Usually_Ideal Nov 10 '22

I got 99 problem but COVID ain’t one.

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u/MichaelSkeptic Nov 10 '22

That was more like 98

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u/FLORI_DUH Nov 10 '22

Why are Mass Shootings and Gun Violence two separate categories?

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u/Throwawaymytrash77 Nov 10 '22

It's unfortunate that so many people think who we vote in will change inflation. It's worldwide inflation. While we might be a world leader, we don't control the world economy. The inflation is being dealt with literally as fast as it can be, which is a long time frame. Somehow though, republican voters are convinced getting their guys into office will change that🤷‍♂️ If anything, their fiscal policy is even worse, as history has shown over the last hundred or so years.

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u/[deleted] Nov 10 '22

Wow! Republicans were really, really wrong weren’t they?

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u/OhhhYaaa Nov 10 '22

Aka why Americans should watch less news.

3

u/[deleted] Nov 11 '22

I’ve never met anyone who is afraid of monkey pox. Hell nobody cares about Covid anymore and we locked down for two years.

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u/dancingsteveburns Nov 10 '22

I don’t believe any of this

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u/foggy-sunrise Nov 10 '22

How is immigration so scary to so many people?

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u/OsakaWilson Nov 10 '22

Hello people of the future looking back at this post. Some of us at this time recognize climate change as a serious issue. We aren't all complete idiots.

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u/pattack8 Nov 10 '22

Where is the category for people stressed about not enough people being stressed about climate change?

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u/jereezy Nov 10 '22

Why the fuck did they split up "Violence and Crime," "Mass Shootings," and "Gun Violence?"

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u/RobertStonetossBrand Nov 10 '22

Possibly to juice the data in a certain direction

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u/RegulatoryCapture Nov 10 '22

Honestly, they capture different things.

Crime is down historically (although you wouldn't know it by watching Fox or the local news). Way down compared to 1980-90s. Yes, nobody likes to see crime go UP, but most of the movements that get reported on are statistical noise or clearly a temporary phenomena (like COVID-weirdness).

So a fully informed rational person might not be particularly concerned about general "Violence and Crime" but might still be concerned about extremely worrying trends in school shootings and general gun violence--since while overall crime is still well below the early-90s peak, Gun deaths are above it (both suicides and homicides).

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u/ESH29 Nov 10 '22

You forgot the corrupt politicians that created half of the list..

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u/[deleted] Nov 10 '22

Climate change should be at the top.

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u/ConserveTheWorld Nov 10 '22

Hard for people to think about climate change when they're worried about basic needs like feeding themselves or their families.

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u/Asneekyfatcat Nov 10 '22

Didn't polls show abortion at nearly the top with crime barely making top 5? This data is sus.

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u/err0rz Nov 10 '22

Tiny sample group.

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u/heytayo_chemical Nov 10 '22

just try living in turkey for once

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u/InteractionNo7239 Nov 10 '22

More importantly is what are our politicians doing about these items? Nothing that's effective! They want your vote, they want the paycheck, and nothing more.

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u/SaltSlasher Nov 10 '22

Inflation is def the top one, its so far above rest cause impacts every penny

Health care def my #2 as far of getting hurt and going bankrupt

Global Tension #3 pretty much got cold wars going and WW3 doing its preworkout

Pandemic prob 4th both fixing its issue, new variants or another virus

#5 gotta be generalized pollution and fixing things affected by climate change

The rest don't cause me any daily stress. I consider most of them should just be grouped into future of nation

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u/InfoSecPeezy Nov 10 '22

I’m surprised I don’t see the Goliaths.. Al-Quaida, Global Warming, Sex Predators, Mercury Poisoning

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u/dontaggravation Nov 10 '22

I'm not stressed out about inflation -- I'm stressed out that effective wages, in general, have been declining since the 1970's. Recently wages started to increase a tiny bit and then "inflation" not only negated those increases, they flat out reversed them and kept going

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u/shellbellasaurus Nov 10 '22

A sample of 3100 to act as a barometer for 340million over a diverse geography with individual and unique state and municipal stressors to their area. Ok 👍/s

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u/GandalfTheBored Nov 10 '22

Few issues here, this is only 4000 people surveyed, and they are manipulating the data by weighting certain demographics differently than others. I think this is a poor representation on what America is actually stressed about.

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u/A_Good_Azgeda_Spy Nov 10 '22

“Swipe next to see part 2” in the image and it actually works - bless you

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u/dis6wood Nov 10 '22

Imagine being more stressed about mass shootings than healthcare

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u/partizan92 Nov 10 '22

We Americans need to calm the fuck down.

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u/Zuli_Muli Nov 10 '22

Where's shit like job security, worrying about if we are raising our kids right..

Fuck if they had put "will I make it to my next paycheck" on that list it would be at the fucking top.

2

u/Arrow_Maestro Nov 10 '22

It's funny how water shortage isn't even mentioned.

And climate change is like 11 if you want to roll it into that one.

Can't wait to see this list next year.

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u/NoMedium12345 Nov 10 '22

Global warming should probably be at the top of this list, or top 3, but the fact that it's not even in the top 10 shows what a horrible state the country is in lmao

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u/Oz-2 Nov 10 '22

And our wonderful president came out the other day and said he will change nothing going forward to help this country!

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u/Ordinary-Scratch-478 Nov 10 '22

I’m confused that so many people voted for inflation. I mean I get that it’s important, but seriously?

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u/AnotherAnonGringo Nov 10 '22

Seems like this survey simply asked "Does X cause you any stress?"

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u/captstinkybutt Nov 10 '22

The fact that climate change isn't even in the top 10, let alone where it should be (#1) is really fucking disheartening.

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u/majestic_failure Nov 10 '22

It's ok to not be more stressed by something, even if it's important.

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u/danseaman6 Nov 10 '22

This is bad data represented badly.

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u/NoMoLerking Nov 10 '22

Climate change not even cracking the top 10? Really looking forward to the surprised Pikachu face when 100M climate refugees come to visit.