r/dataisbeautiful OC: 5 Nov 29 '22 Helpful 1

[OC] The median sale price for a single family residence in the US, by state OC

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16.0k Upvotes

1.6k comments sorted by

737

u/ehutch2005 Nov 29 '22

I think it'd be interesting to do a comparison between 2019 and 2022 just to see how the pandemic affected the rapid rise in housing prices.

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u/FaustusC Nov 29 '22

Agreed. And people would still deny it was an issue lol

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

Well the people that deny it’s an issue probably own houses lol I’d be thrilled if I bought a house for 200k in 2018 and could sell it for 350k in less than 5 years. That’s the kind of return people used to get on houses after 20 years, not fucking 5. Totally unsustainable.

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u/MrStalinko Nov 29 '22

I wish I was financially prepared to buy a house in 2019. Could've gotten something pretty nice. Now that I'm ready, I can't afford the cheapest on the market.

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u/barley_wine Nov 30 '22

I’m in a crappy Texas town, want to move somewhere more moderate and now that my kids are old enough that I feel okay moving away from relatives, housing everywhere has gotten insane. Pretty depressing, if this was 2019 half of the US cities would have been affordable.

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u/rustafarionm Nov 29 '22

I think everyone notices how much housing has increased...

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u/tevert Nov 29 '22

... who is denying it's an issue?

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u/38384 OC: 1 Nov 29 '22

Even better: a comparison between 2022 and 1996 (the last year before the property boom)

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u/CarefulCoderX Nov 30 '22

Lol I was thinking about how 300-400k is listed as an "affordable" color (if we're talking about data vis, then green is usually correlated with good).

A $325k house with a $65k down payment at today's best interest rates is going to leave you with an over $1900 monthly payment after taxes.

So for the median household income, you have to save about 1 years salary BEFORE taxes. Then you're paying probably over $2k per month if you're considering maintenance, HOA, etc.

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u/TheDeadlySquid Nov 29 '22

Yep, DC is a little red dot. Should break it down by county. I think it would create a little more clarity on where the wealth is located. The disparity between Northern Virginia and the rest of the state is mind boggling.

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u/calguy1955 Nov 29 '22

Correct. It’s the same with every state. The difference in median price in California between coastal counties and interior counties is about one million dollars.

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u/fucktheroses Nov 29 '22

I live in South Sacramento and even in my neighborhood most homes for sale are half a mil. It’s wild. You can’t even find an empty lot for under 300k

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

[deleted]

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u/copyboy1 Nov 30 '22

I grew up in Woodland. No matter the price, moving there is pointless.

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u/byneothername Nov 30 '22

Uhh I don’t know anyone who grew up in Woodland who liked it enough to go back after college.

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u/glitterandjazzhands Nov 29 '22

47th Ave & Stockton represent!

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u/fucktheroses Nov 29 '22

yooo i’m at mlk and fruitridge. i love seeing my neighbors in the wilds of the internet!

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u/UnintelligentComment Nov 29 '22

Hey I know these areas! Checking in from Citrus Heights :)

12

u/ceesa Nov 29 '22

I grew up near Watt and Fair Oaks. Happy to hear all the old names again.

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u/KarlBarx2 Nov 30 '22

It's wild you guys are doxxing yourselves like this.

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u/Gangringo Nov 29 '22

I just bought a house in Sacramento. The only way I was able to do it was inheriting another house in Sacramento and selling that one.

Selling high and buying high means I have a totally reasonable mortgage and eye-watering property taxes.

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u/secretcombinations Nov 29 '22

Elk grooooove!

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u/inyourface317 Nov 29 '22

I live away from all major CA cities and you can still feel the increase in my market . Houses are up 50% from 5 years ago. While the difference from coastal to here is a MIL or more , you are quickly out priced in my area.

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u/MyTrademarkIsTaken Nov 30 '22

I live just outside Sacramento city lines and houses here are 900k. It’s mind boggling.

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u/NotMyThrowawayNope Nov 29 '22

Lol. Even to live in the shittiest most crime ridden worst parts of the city its still $500k+ easy.

Just for fun I was looking at the new housing tract being built near Oak Park. NOPE.

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u/AtsignAmpersat Nov 29 '22

I’d love to see this by county.

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u/The_Penguinologist Nov 29 '22

As someone currently in the market in NOVA, I can confidently say that 300-400k isn’t gonna get you anything more than a shed next to a highway or a crappy condo.

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u/yourshaddow3 Nov 29 '22

Not even a good highway. You'd be stuck next to 66.

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u/LurkerOrHydralisk Nov 29 '22

Even that would be deceptive. Baltimore is full of expensive housing, but mix in the hundreds of vacants “for sale” and you might get a different picture.

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u/Faith_Lies Nov 29 '22

You don’t get a ‘different picture’ with wide extremes when taking the median value(what this map is showing). Only when taking an average do extreme values affect the final result.

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u/prss79513 Nov 29 '22

Median in NOVA is surely 600+

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u/BeefyIrishman Nov 29 '22

I know in NC the county I live in has a medium home sale price around $500k, but the county my brother used to live in has a median sale price around $135k. One county has a median home value (didn't see median sale price in my quick search) of only $78k.

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u/daryltry12 Nov 29 '22

Same to NYC and the rest of the State, Las Vegas and Nevada and probably a few more States. There are very affordable places to live in the US...mostly outside of large cities.

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u/Eudaimonics Nov 29 '22

Meanwhile in places like Jamestown, NY you can still find homes for under $100k

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u/dopebdopenopepope Nov 30 '22

Meth—that’s all I’ll say.

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

Yeah, good luck finding a home under $600k in NOVA 😭

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u/buzzzzz1 Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

South Dakota surprises me a little, I assumed 200-300. I assume Minneapolis has a huge impact on Minnesota with half the states population living in the metro.

Illinois and Minnesota are unique in the Midwest with over 60% living in one metro. Most Midwest states are in the 20-30% range.

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u/mourninglark Nov 29 '22

Lots of single family homes on ranches. It's not the houses that raise the value, but the property.

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u/Jtwohy Nov 29 '22

not really. the Black Hills and Sioux Falls are the driving force Rapid for example say its housing market explode over the last year with a 25% increase in home values year over year from last year.

AVG home Value SD Spearfish 414K Rapid 318 SF 330K Mitchell 220K

long story short if you don't live in the Black Hills or Sioux Falls Metro area home prices are were people would have assumed they are at. Both the BH and the I29 corridor have experenced massive booms over the last few years

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u/GolgiApparatus1 Nov 29 '22

Makes sense driving through it. ND has been booming all over the place, especially any cities remotely close to oil. Bismarck has been like non stop expansion for years.

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u/metrologica Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

As a South Dakotan, I see this misnomer quite often. South Dakota is not an oil state. The oil fields you are referring to are primarily in North Dakota, whereas South Dakota produces less than 1% of the nation’s total.

My state relies heavily on the tourism industry during the summer months as people flock to visit the Black Hills National Forest, Mt. Rushmore, and the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally.

This summer, the Rapid City metro area (it’s called the “gateway to the Black Hills”) became the WSJ’s number one emerging housing market. Housing prices have jumped exponentially during the pandemic because our governor spent a lot of the taxpayers’ money advertising us as a “freedom” state. It’s pricing out a lot of the locals and putting homeownership out of reach for many, as our wages have not kept up the pace.

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u/Dealan79 Nov 29 '22

ND has been booming all over the place, especially any cities remotely close to oil.

This is the story that people need to understand when they wonder how so many people are adamant global warming deniers. When your personal, family, and community well-being are tied to fossil fuels and/or livestock, you are going to develop defense mechanisms that keep you from focusing on the catastrophic negative effects of those industries. We all do it to some degree, as is evidenced by the fact that we're all communicating using equipment that probably involved slave labor at some point in the supply chain while using power that is (for most of us) not from 100% renewable sources. "The Good Place" really captured well the idea that engaging with modern life makes it incredibly difficult, or impossible, to live a truly moral life, and yet none of us wants to go through life feeling like a villain.

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u/cah11 Nov 29 '22

Exactly, living at a 1st world standard with our current level of technology requires some degree of moral flexibility, especially in the US. Everyone can (and should) strive to live as sustainably, morally, and cleanly as possible. But the fact of the matter is, unless you're going to live in a personally built shelter off the grid with self grown food, a self dug well, and no access to consumer goods, chances are someone somewhere suffered some indignity at best (cruelty at worst) to allow you to live the way you do.

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u/SupremeNachos Nov 29 '22

MN is high because the suburbs are exploding with new homes. Where I live most new homes are going for the low 400s and quite a few going for 600+.

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u/BlahajBestie Nov 29 '22

It's not just suburbs. Minneapolis has a major housing boom since the zoning laws were reworked.

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u/JasonThree Nov 29 '22

Glad I got a house in the inner rings last year for under 300k

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u/Roflrofat Nov 29 '22

I remember my parents selling theirs for 220 in Richfield and thinking they made away like bandits

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u/Bockto678 Nov 29 '22

It's probably like $290k in North Dakota/Nebraska and $310k in South Dakota. The large bins make it seem like a bigger gap than it is.

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u/justforkicks7 OC: 1 Nov 29 '22

The Dakotas have a different problem. The oil business up there pays a lot for local support like truck drivers, which takes labor away from construction type industries. Why would you be a residential electrician or concrete guy when you can get paid much more working the oil fields? That drives local labor up, so the cost to build and acquire resources is high. That translates to high prices.

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u/metrologica Nov 29 '22

Am South Dakotan. My state is not an oil state. Please don’t lump us in with them.

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

*North Dakota

South Dakota doesn't have a notable oil industry.

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u/nixstyx Nov 29 '22

You know what would be interesting to see -- the media sale price for a home compared to median household income. That might highlight areas where homes are just not affordable (or, even more unaffordable) for the average family.

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u/THofTheShire Nov 29 '22

Unfortunately, you'd probably need to break it down by county or vicinity somehow. For example, California is a big state, and home prices as well as income vary significantly with just an hour's drive.

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u/soffey Nov 29 '22

Same with Maine. Vacation mansions for millions along the coast, old cheap houses inland.

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u/ImanShumpertplus Nov 29 '22

that’s how every place in the country is

your typical urban dwelling will be 3x that of a rural area and a suburban dwelling will be 2x that of a rural dwelling

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u/SheSellsSeaShells967 Nov 29 '22

Right. Maine seems low, but we are a pretty poor state. Regular people can’t afford houses right now.

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u/Lopieht Nov 29 '22

Seacoast & York county are brutal right now. Rent has also followed the housing market and the added heating cost has made it untenable for a lot of people here.

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u/Laeek Nov 29 '22

I made a post in the Maine sub for 2021 data showing that a family making the median household income can't afford a home for sale at the median price. Some of the math is kind of back-of-the-napkin, but you're correct. A regular person can't afford a regular house.

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u/Bob_Sconce Nov 29 '22

You have to watch out there, because you're making an implicit assumption that the median household ought to be able to afford to buy the median house. But, that's not a good assumption. The median household is NOT the median homebuyer.

Consider, for example, retirees who are living off savings and social security. Their median household income is very low. But, many of them own their own homes outright. And, of those that don't own a home, some portion are in independent living/assisted-care facilities, and just have no reason to ever purchase a home.

Also, consider the single 22-year-old, who just graduated from college, is living in an apartment. That person isn't in the market for a house either. Among other things, regardless of where prices are, he/she hasn't had time to save up *any* down payment.

So, you are ALWAYS going to sea a situation where the median home is out-of-reach of the median household.

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u/BabyStockholmSyndrom Nov 29 '22

My area of south Florida median home price is 350k and income is 52k lol. Rents are close to 2k a month for "not get robbed and shot" areas. Not nice areas. Just not deadly.

Everyone here is about to be bankrupt and somehow it's a red area so they all blame Biden even though it skyrocketed during trump.

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u/Justin101501 Nov 29 '22

Florida is the most expensive state in the US once you account for wages

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u/couldbutwont Nov 29 '22

When did Utah stop being cheap

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u/spacey_kasey Nov 29 '22

Around when I graduated college and got an adult job. Housing prices were increasing faster here than country as a whole from at least 2015 to the start of the pandemic.

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u/AltruisticCoelacanth Nov 29 '22

When the secret got out

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u/RedditFenix Nov 29 '22

When Californians came with money bags and paid cash for all the houses that were for sale.

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u/zimbaboo Nov 29 '22

It’s not out of state migration driving the bubble. It’s because of the Utah-born residents who never leave. Utah has one of lowest out-migration rates than any other state. Children born into the big Mormon families between 1980–2000 are now entering the housing market. Housing development slowed down after the Great Recession which never caught up with the population rate. There is simply not enough housing due to Utah’s own short-sightedness and mismanagement. Out of state buyers don’t help, but they are hardly to blame for the prices and problems we have today.

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u/RedditFenix Nov 29 '22

You may be right. My personal anecdotal experience in selling multiple houses over the last 5 years, is multiple cash offers from people coming from California. Small sample size.

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u/TripleSecretSquirrel Nov 30 '22

Ya, small sample size. I’m trying to find it now, but about a year ago a study found tht the above commenter is basically spot on. The popular narrative is that it’s Californians moving to Utah, but it just seems like that because they’re “outsiders.”

I left Utah recentlyish but I’ve got three siblings there who have bought houses in in Utah in the last few years and nobody batted an eye cause they’re locals. My family is comparatively spread out too. More of us live outside of Utah than in.

For my anecdotally small sample size looking at my high school class for example, most of my peers were from families of 3 or more kids with about 10% from families of 6 or more kids. Nearly all of them still live in Utah and are of right about what would traditionally be home-buying age.

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u/MooseBoys Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

Who the fuck abbreviates “thousands of dollars” as “tsd”? Also, without scaling by income this is not particularly meaningful.

Edit: Thanks to u/Uraniu below, it seems like "Tsd" is the German equivalent of "K". Who knew? Still out of place outside of r/ich_iel, but at least it's not some self-created acronym.

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u/MightiestDuck Nov 30 '22

Fuck, thank you. Didn't even know what "tsd" was supposed to mean.

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u/_Cabbage_Corp_ Nov 30 '22

I was able to figure it out after a second, but seriously who thinks tsd USD would be better than just putting a k after the numbers?

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u/mmarollo Nov 29 '22

Canada is in the world’s worst bubble. Most of Canada is orange/red. Meanwhile incomes are much lower than in US.

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

have you tried idk building more cities

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u/Sennheisenberg Nov 29 '22

I think the goal is to just slowly spread Toronto across the whole country.

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u/cloudcats Nov 29 '22

What, and tear our igloos down?

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u/prone2scone Nov 29 '22

More room for moose parking.

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u/smitty3z Nov 29 '22

Time to get out Sim City 4

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u/7adzius Nov 29 '22

Most of them will be bought up by ultra wealthy foreigners to rent or even sit empty because their own countries are unstable

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u/Kickstand8604 Nov 29 '22

Vice just came out with an article that shows how the wealthy hedge funds and stock market guys are using AI to find the best single family homes to buy

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u/FlyWhiteGuyActual Nov 29 '22

it's, lets see 2007..., over a decade too late.

The Big Short is already a movie.

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u/daryltry12 Nov 29 '22

It's poor government policies, not wealthy foreigners that are at fault

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u/Ambiwlans Nov 29 '22

Median house price (by sales) in Canada is $816,720 CAD. 600k USD. And wages are like 25% lower in Canada.

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u/RedshiftOnPandy Nov 30 '22

Add more taxes and it's closer to 50%

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u/catinterpreter Nov 29 '22

I'd like to see how it compares to Australia, in magnitude and duration.

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u/inconity Nov 29 '22

I was just about to say Canada would have a lot of red and orange… I’d laugh if we weren’t all doomed up here

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u/Radix2309 Nov 29 '22

Tbf we do have an exchange rate.

Anything light green in US dollars becomes yellow after the exchange rate.

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u/treemoustache Nov 29 '22

Yeah this map feels like the US bragging about their low house prices to me.

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u/GooseMantis Nov 29 '22

Its even worse than it looks because US incomes are higher. The median household income in Ontario in is $91k CAD, or roughly $67k USD. That's about the same level as Oregon.

According to this map, Oregon's average home sale price is in the 400-500k range. Let's call it $450k, or $610k CAD. The average home sale price in Ontario is $840k CAD, a whole 38% higher than Oregon. And 840k is a drop, during the height of the bubble in 2021 it was probably around a million if not more.

Yeah, outside of the prairies, Canada's housing market is royally fucked. It's funny when I see Americans romanticizing Canada, sure there are a lot of great things about Canada but things are not all that great up here these days

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u/Jefoid Nov 29 '22

Fun game when I am bored: Get on Google Earth and pick a random small town in the Midwest. Zoom in and find the nicest area of “downtown” farmhouses. Switch to Zillow. You can often buy beautiful older houses on tree-lined streets for $200k or less.

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u/ThreeLeggedTranny Nov 29 '22

I live in (well, outside of) a small town in the Midwest. People are blown away when they come visit and see very well taken care of 5 bedroom mansions on 40 acres for less than a studio apartment costs in some cities. If you are like me and love rural living and can work remotely, you can pretty much live like a king.

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u/raisinghellwithtrees Nov 29 '22

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u/Jefoid Nov 29 '22

Wow! Exactly. What a cute house! Put a few bucks in to it and it would be gorgeous and still pretty affordable.

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u/JTuck333 Nov 29 '22

Does anyone believe that this will result in a gradual migration? Is this already happening?

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u/SpicyHashbrowns Nov 29 '22

I'm in Montana, lots of Californians are moving here.

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u/Unemployed_Fisherman Nov 29 '22

Last year (maybe still), UHaul was offering discounts to people who moved to NYC or California because there were no trucks left there

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u/AshTheDead1te Nov 29 '22

Don’t live there anymore as I moved last year but that is the same for Idaho, it was crazy watching a house go from $200k to 600k in 1-2years, homes that should never be a million dollars in a suburb in Meridian, Idaho, I make a decent amount and I was priced out hence the move.

All while a Californian or someone from New York buys a house with cash with a $40-$100k over asking price offer.

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u/flyfree256 Nov 29 '22

California is basically full, at least in the desirable areas that aren't just desert or farmland (largely because local govs don't zone for mass housing due to NIMBYs among other things).

Over the last 10 years, 6.1 million people left California and 4.9 million moved to California. 23% of those leaving (1.4 million, making up for the deficit) cited housing as the reason they were leaving. Also, the majority of people who left were lower/middle class, and those who came in were vastly moreso higher income individuals.

This speaks much more to California being full and expensive rather than it being undesirable to live in. If anything, it's particularly desirable to live in which sucks for the majority of people because it drives costs up to ungodly levels. Obviously, the high tax rate and other factors play a role, but it's very clear that more people would move to California than leave if they could.

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u/millerba213 Nov 29 '22

This speaks much more to California being full and expensive rather than it being undesirable to live in.

I think that's definitely true to an extent. California has incredible weather and geography that you simply can't get anywhere else and that alone is always going to make CA highly desirable regardless of circumstance. And if you're vastly wealthy and money is essentially no object, CA is always going to be attractive for that reason.

The problem is that as the cost of living continues to skyrocket, the quality of life for most middle class in CA continues to diminish. They're paying more and more for less and less, and especially during COVID when they even shut down the beaches you start to wonder, why am I here? What exactly am I paying so much for?

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u/syndicatecomplex Nov 29 '22

California doesn't build enough housing, I don't think it's full in the slightest.

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u/LeCrushinator Nov 29 '22

Is it full or can poor and average wage folks just no longer afford to live there? I'm assuming some people might be leaving due to the conditions as well (drought and wildfires). The cost of living might also be reducing the numbers of people able to move there.

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u/PaperBoxPhone Nov 29 '22

There is enough space, the housing policy is just atrocious so its too hard to build. As well as how the rest of it is run so poorly that its just hard to live there so people are moving.

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u/JasonThree Nov 29 '22

It has for the last several years

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u/miclugo Nov 29 '22

For me the most surprising one is Utah.

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u/Gotexan-YT Nov 29 '22

90% of Utah lives in the area between +/- 50 miles north/south of salt lake, and that entire area is limited in space because it’s sandwiched between the Rockies and the lake. So basically housing is expensive for the reason that there’s very limited development space and lots of people that want the houses that are here, leading to high prices

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u/kiticus Nov 29 '22

It's the entire state, not just the Wasatch front.

Look at prices in places like Vernal, Cedar City, Fillmore, Richfield, Kanab.

All small cities, far from metro areas, with home prices matching those of Wasatch Front suburbs like Eagle Mountain & Tooele.

It's crazy

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u/cichlid1316 Nov 30 '22

Cedar City prices have gotten batshit crazy. I bought early 2019, if I sold today, I could get almost 3x what I paid. In Cedar City. Who would've thunk.

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u/notepad7 Nov 29 '22

Not surprising if you live there.

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u/madness817 Nov 29 '22

I'm currently in salt lake crying about these home prices

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u/wyldklitoris Nov 29 '22

Same here.. me and my fiance are trying to find a new place and it sucks knowing that buying is almost completely out of the question.. and a 2 bedroom rental is getting close to 2k a month.. when just 3 years ago I was renting a 4 bedroom house for 1800

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u/allonoak Nov 29 '22

We bought a house back then because we didn't like them raising our rent from $1650 to $1700. We had sticker shock back then and it has just gotten worse.

Of course, the increase in property value has impacted our property taxes notably, so we're still seeing an increase of about $50 a month every year anyway.

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u/alphawolf29 Nov 29 '22

Pretty sure utah is the fastest growing state

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u/StormingCitadels Nov 29 '22

I am currently in Utah crying due these housing prices.

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u/Pretty-Balance-Sheet Nov 29 '22

Utah is super desirable. Big tech. Lots of outdoor activities. Economy here is completely killing it. Wages are almost at California levels. The state is reasonably well run. It's not too surprising for those who live here.

I've been lucky and have been able to buy and sell a few places around slc over the last decade. Wish I could've done more, but it worked out pretty well. Since 2010 prices have gone about 3x. The housing market here was already going bonkers when prices started to skyrocket during covid.

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u/Reading_username Nov 29 '22

B.bb.bbuutttt morrrmoonss!

The average Americans perception of Utah is ridiculously wrong and out of touch.

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u/gummybearattack Nov 30 '22

Wages are not at a California level lol.

Both my field, and a cousins field in Utah pay double what Utah does.

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u/Myshkin1981 Nov 29 '22

I know this map makes California home prices look high, but it’s actually skewed by all the shitty inland areas. If you want to live near the coast, it’ll cost a lot more than $600k

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u/MagAqua Nov 29 '22

PA holdin it down for the east coast 💪

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u/bucksncowboys513 Nov 29 '22

It's so funny, being from Ohio, I never think of Pennsylvania as "East Coast" but I guess that makes some sense. Just goes to show, western and central PA are vastly different than Eastern PA.

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u/BestWesterChester Nov 29 '22

Philadelphia is closer to the ocean than 3/4 of California.

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u/miclugo Nov 29 '22

As a native Philadelphian, the idea that Pittsburgh is in the same state as Philadelphia never made sense to me. (Nothing against Pittsburgh! It just might as well be in Ohio.)

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

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u/miclugo Nov 29 '22

no, Charlie thinks there's only one city in each state and there are already cities in Ohio.

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u/BobbatheSolo Nov 29 '22

If there’s one thing I can rely on in this crazy world it’s that when an unintentional IASIP reference is made, Reddit always delivers

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u/dinoscool3 Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 30 '22

Moving us to OH would be bad for you and us. We’d be stuck in Ohio and then the Pennsyltuckians would out number you!

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u/miclugo Nov 29 '22

Alright, you can stay. I still think it’s weird you put fries in your sandwiches though.

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u/AyeOhEwe Nov 29 '22

Pennsyltuckians

As a PA transplant in KY, I love this. I always tell people, if it weren't for the snow and funny accents, you'd think Pennsylvania was Alabama.

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u/Euphoric-Buyer2537 Nov 29 '22

Philly in the east, Pittsburgh in the west, Alabama in between.

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

Don't you dare lump us in with Ohio!

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u/floatius Nov 29 '22

Also from Ohio. I always felt like Pittsburg was still the Midwest but Philly was east coast.

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u/mikehouse72 Nov 29 '22

PA is 2 states. One is east coast the other is Midwest.

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u/sittingmongoose Nov 29 '22

East side of pa is certainly not holding it down lol there are no single family homes here under 600k unless you are straight up in the ghetto.

This should be broken down by county because the difference between say south east pa and central pa is astounding and that’s just Pa. I’m sure other states are the same way.

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u/Spanky_McJiggles Nov 29 '22

I feel the same way about New York. Downstate is definitely skewing the results.

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u/ninjewz Nov 29 '22

It's a weird situation. Philly suburbs and the Lehigh Valley are all high but then you get up to the Poconos and properties are dirt cheap. All of the state that was based around coal mining is literally stuck in the past.

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

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u/an_actual_lawyer Nov 29 '22

My only cricicism is that this map should be by county. Take Kansas, for instance. You can find good condition, single family homes in rural towns for $50,000 - $100,000 all day long. In the cities, that will be $300,000 - $500,000.

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u/boomers314 Nov 30 '22

We live in a (by Kansas standards) mid size city, population 25k, home to a top 5 KS university, and bought newly remodeled 5 bedroom home in a very nice part of town for under 300k. I’ve lived here all of my 50 years alive and if you can tolerate the manic weather and driving an hour between towns, this is one of the most affordable places to live.

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u/joleme Nov 29 '22

Seems like this isn't the best indicator of prices in a state. I live in IA and most 'ready to live in' houses that don't require work are around 130-160k, but there are tons of more places that need work or are in the shit areas that are 60k or less. Makes me wonder just how many luxury houses there are in the state to make the median this high.

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u/msw1984 Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

I grew up in Iowa City and Coralville but have lived in San Diego the last decade or so. Been looking at house prices in Iowa recently because of how high homes are in southern California.

Just looking at median prices of homes in some of the more desirable cities of Iowa (different relator sites give different median prices):

  • Iowa City: $270,000-330,000.

  • Johnston: $360,000-452,000.

  • Coralville: $230,000-389,000.

  • West Des Moines: $275,000-320,000.

  • Ames: $265,000-295,000.

  • Mt. Vernon: $290,000-310,000.

  • North Liberty: $280,000-340,000.

  • Clive: $375,000-425,000.

  • Bettendorf: $244,000-340,000.

Where in Iowa are you located u/joleme?

I was in Cedar Rapids and Marion recently visiting some family...lots of shitty areas of Cedar Rapids I wouldn't be surprised to find a 2+ bedroom house for under $100,000. Certainly wouldn't want to live in those neighborhoods where those prices are found though.

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u/joleme Nov 29 '22

I was in Cedar Rapids and Marion recently visiting some family...lots of shitty areas of Cedar Rapids I wouldn't be surprised to find a 2+ bedroom house for under $100,000. Certainly wouldn't want to live in those neighborhoods where those prices are found though.

As I said, depends what you're looking at. You're not wrong that CR is turning into a shithole pretty quickly, and marion is trying to resist the rot.

I'm working my way up, but I grew up with the alcoholics, drug addicts, and shitty people so most of the towns I've been to/in are the ones with lower prices. You're not wrong that most people would rather live in most of the other cities, but affording it is ridiculous.

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u/kewl_grapes Nov 29 '22

Eh, there's pockets of good and bad in CR, just like any other city. Wife and I bought a well-kept 93-year old house in a good neighborhood in CR for $250K back in 2020. Just appraised for a little over $350K a couple weeks ago.

But yeah, not out of the ordinary to see houses sell for under $120K around here.

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u/ABCosmos OC: 4 Nov 29 '22

Imagine paying coastal elitist prices.. but you live in Idaho

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u/SkootchDown Nov 29 '22

This cracks me up. The map should most definitely be done by city, because there isn’t even a pitched tent available in my state, in a three country range where I live, which is all on the coast (not Florida), and it puts our median home range at 200-300k? Yeah, back in 1989.

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u/usermanxx Nov 29 '22

I don't believe this for montana. It's fucking expensive there

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u/markusbrainus Nov 29 '22

I have never seen thousand abbreviated as tsd. It's usually k, M, or 1000's.

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u/KerPop42 Nov 29 '22

I wish I could live away from the cities, but when I tried I nearly got sucked into the isolation and alcoholism. My boss's idea of a fun night was playing darts, there was exactly one place within an hour's drive that did board games. Everyone wanted to leave.

I thought that I could make it if I brought like, 10 friends with me, but then I realized that that's just most of the way to a commune

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u/420BlazeItF4gg0t Nov 29 '22

I get it, but you went from one extreme to another and I don't blame you. You need an area like around me where there's constant stuff going on in local parks and "downtown" areas. Things only start getting dull around January and February when it's still cold and there aren't any "big" holiday festivities.

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u/DetroitLionsSBChamps Nov 29 '22

I used to fantasize about my friends and I starting a commune. I still do but I used to too

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u/KerPop42 Nov 29 '22

Same lol. It wouldn't not be nice, so long as we had enough space to ourselves. We could go in on expensive equipment, have game nights, movie nights, schedule meals...

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u/Ambiwlans Nov 29 '22

8 professionals moving to a rural area and splitting a piece of land could afford to have an on site cook and a helicopter.

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u/ThreeLeggedTranny Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

I know this sounds painfully obvious, but the key to living rural is enjoying rural things. I live in rural Missouri and love it here, but it always cracks me up when people move here for the cheap housing and then move away because it doesn't have certain big-city entertainment options, like that never occurred to them before they came.

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u/Hovie1 Nov 29 '22

This sounds like northern Wisconsin

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u/McSkeez Nov 29 '22

South Carolina here, my 200k house from 6 years ago is now worth about 450-500... Inflation and cost of living is driving up everything. I can't afford to sell or buy another, and everyone keeps moving here average income is 30k household 60k. 🙃🙃

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u/formerlyanonymous_ Nov 29 '22

Quick, everyone move to Mississippi!

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u/partiallypro Nov 29 '22

These prices are still absolutely insane.

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u/karmacarmelon Nov 29 '22

What's the deal with Washington state? Is it just Seattle skewing the value?

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u/Dontsleeponlilyachty Nov 29 '22

A buddy of mine lives on a quarter acre plot in Ridgefield, WA. His house is ranch style, 2 bed 1.5 bath. Old home, hasn't been updated since early 2000s...

It's valued at 750k.

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u/PeanutNSFWandJelly Nov 29 '22

YUP. People here talking Seattle and Renton and they just don't get that it's not just the major hubs here. It's literally everywhere from boonies to suburb.

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u/H2Bro_69 Nov 29 '22

It’s not just Seattle, it’s the entire Seattle Metro Area that contributes to the high average(even though Seattle city limits is the highest COL of the area). The metro area is half the population of the state. It’s about 3.5 to 4 million people in total, and a large percentage of that is HCOL areas with high housing prices. Some of those Seattle suburbs are quite cushy.

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u/RossinTheBobs Nov 29 '22

It's basically the whole I-5 corridor that's ridiculously expensive, aside from maybe the Chehalis/Centralia area. Pretty much all the way from Olympia to the BC border is way overpriced. Even in places way out in the boonies (e.g. Darrington), you'd be lucky to find a reasonable house for $450K.

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u/noxx1234567 Nov 29 '22

Big IT sector , low inventory , people moving from California pushing up the home prices

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u/edgeplot Nov 29 '22

There's a ton of money in the tech sector, which is huge here, and lots of people who buy here are from out of state. Many of Seattle's suburbs are more expensive than Seattle proper (Mercer Island, Bellevue, Kirkland, Redmond, Lake Sammamish, etc.). The state isn't building enough housing to keep up with demand. Most cities restrict density quite a bit, which causes sprawl. And Seattle is squished between mountains and water without any space to sprawl, so demand is further increased and with it prices. The spacious eastern side of the state is considerably more affordable.

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u/aspacelot Nov 29 '22

Redmond is pricy. Microsoft’s home city.

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u/karmacarmelon Nov 29 '22

Thought that might have something to do with it.

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u/Valyrian_Kobolds Nov 29 '22

Not just redmond though. Even fucking Everett is pricy, fuck even Marysville and Puyallup are fucking expensive now.

Looked at Port Angeles and even that is above 400k. For fucks sake even Aberdeen is about 400

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u/born_in_cyberspace OC: 5 Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

My guess is that the high percentage of people living in big cities could noticeably increase the median, as the housing there is typically much more costly. This could also partially explain the California anomaly. Of course, in the case of California, urbanization is likely not the main factor.

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u/PeanutNSFWandJelly Nov 29 '22

I live here and it's not just Seattle. I live about an hour south of Seattle and my neighborhood had houses around the 175-220k range about 7yrs ago. Now they go for over 300k easy. I looked south where it's more rural and single wide trailers legit going for 150k+. It doesn't get low until you get pretty far into the sticks and even then it's not as low as it was by a longshot.

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u/Bitter-Basket Nov 29 '22

Over in Kitsap county, an hour from Seattle or so by ferry, the houses are around $475K median value.

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u/asarious Nov 29 '22

I suppose that depends on the definition of urbanization.

Most of California’s pricier regions are still heavily developed and located within the metropolitan areas of San Diego, Los Angeles, or the Bay Area.

The truly suburban and rural locales away from those metros are probably much more on par with the national average (e.g., Bakersfield).

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u/MsSnarkitysnarksnark Nov 29 '22

I live on an island in the PNW of Washington state, it's awesome here! We can surf, snowboard, rock climb all within an hour of where I live. And Seattle is closer, like 30 minutes. So concerts, nice dinners, shows etc are not hours away. We bought in 2016 and our home value has doubled since then. I feel bad for people trying to buy now.

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u/38384 OC: 1 Nov 29 '22

I'm from Seattle Metro and it's high everywhere here. The only places in the state to get something for cheap is in the far rural east.

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u/ChornWork2 Nov 29 '22

Still irks me that federal income tax doesn't come with a COLA adjustment. The fact that a nurse or cook working in a high-cost area pays more $ to federal govt than someone doing the same job in a low-cost area is ridiculous. Because someone has to pay more for basic housing means they need higher salary, which then translates to higher tax $. Exacerbates the subsidies that urban areas already pay for rural areas.

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u/anothercopy Nov 29 '22

What is considered "single family residence in the US" ? How many suare meeters / feet / doplhins per acre ? Are we talking about a flat , house, duplex ?

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u/born_in_cyberspace OC: 5 Nov 29 '22

As I understand, the data source is referring to this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-family_detached_home

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u/CharlotteRant Nov 29 '22

One home, one kitchen, no shared walls (detached).

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u/MaNGo_FizZ Nov 29 '22

NYC skewing the rest of New York

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u/IHkumicho Nov 29 '22

Not just NYC, but the entire metro area. Long Island and Westchester are also stupidly expensive, and Orange and Putnam counties aren't much better.

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u/Redeem123 Nov 29 '22

That's pretty much true for the entire map. Every state is being skewed by their biggest cities, to the point where this data really isn't useful at all.

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u/all_neon_like_13 Nov 29 '22

Yeah I live in NYC but was just in my podunk hometown Upstate for Thanksgiving, where home prices are around $200k on average. There are lots of cheap areas to live Upstate; the problem is you probably don't want to live in them.

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u/ExpoAve17 Nov 29 '22

Illinois is green in housing prices, however, their property taxes will fuck you straight in the bunghole with no lube.

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u/printers_rock Nov 29 '22

Property taxes are based on county, not state. So, yeah, while Chicago area counties seem higher, most of the state seems pretty average. https://www.tax-rates.org/illinois/property-tax

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

It also has relatively low state income tax, middle of the road sales tax burden and Chicago’s cost of living is one of the lowest of all the largest cities.

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u/ferchalurch Nov 29 '22

TIL that if I wanted to live in the mountains I should move to Wyoming

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u/SpruceArena Nov 30 '22

So basically housing is cheap in places no one wants to live

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22

Everything close to coast or mountains is more expensive got it

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u/born_in_cyberspace OC: 5 Nov 29 '22

Tools: python (plotly)

Data sources:

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u/MasonJack12 Nov 29 '22

New York is misleading. You've got the metro areas which are sky high, and then the rest of New York is relatively cheap.

I'd be interested to see a heat map sort of deal to see what prices near cities are relative to rural areas.

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u/fursphere Nov 29 '22

I was amazed at how 'cheap' houses were in upstate New York. I was like.. Why they hell don't we move there?

Then my wife reminded me of just how cold it gets there.

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u/Jacuul Nov 29 '22

Cold and no jobs. My parents are in the deep upstate area, where I grew up, and 2400 sqft houses for for 100-150k, but you either become a teacher (as a woman) or do construction or prison work (as a man), or sell drugs. It is also fairly hostile to more liberal ideologies, despite the relative poverty. Wasn't always like that, but Trumpism took a strong hold there

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u/thefloyd Nov 29 '22

Telling that your go to example for a dead end job is a teacher, which is a professional job that requires a degree, certification, and continuing education lol. Not saying you're wrong.

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u/Jacuul Nov 29 '22

It wasn't so much that it's a dead-end job as it is the only thing available that pays enough to support a family, the area has an over-abundance of teachers because everything else only pays minimum wage (or less, because not 40-hours a week)

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u/[deleted] Nov 29 '22 edited Nov 29 '22

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u/MarioMCPQ Nov 29 '22

Cheeeeese louise! As a Canadian: this is, wow!

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u/14Ajax14 Nov 29 '22

What am I looking at exactly? Price per square meter, feet? Or the price *1000? I'm assuming the TSD gives it away but I don't know what it stands for and according to Google it's Temperature Sex Determination which doesn't fit within the context.

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u/fantfoot Nov 29 '22

Yes, multiple by 1000 for the price of the house. California and Hawaii for example are $600,000+ for a single family home.

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u/MotorProfessional904 Nov 29 '22

Boy, California is as expensive as Hawaii….really makes you think 🤔

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u/needs_more_zoidberg Nov 29 '22

Red is good right? cries in California

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