r/me_irl knows that all things pass Aug 18 '22 Helpful 3 Wholesome 5 Silver 1 Table Slap 1 Gold 1

me_irl

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92.4k Upvotes

1.9k

u/SmartInMyHead Aug 18 '22 Silver

How dare you not suffer the same way I did!?!

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u/reefer1989 Aug 18 '22

I'm about to have a son and going to make sure never to have that boomer mentality

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u/fivedeadguys Aug 18 '22

Remind me in 18 years.

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u/DeathAddicted 👌 Aug 18 '22

!remindme 18 years

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/Strict_Antelope_6893 hates freedom Aug 18 '22

did he cast a spell or what that means?

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u/JustAFellowRedditer1 Aug 18 '22

When you use !remindeme and a time a bot will text you at that moment you said so that you can come back to the comment or post

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u/Strict_Antelope_6893 hates freedom Aug 18 '22

Oh, cool thanks

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u/dood8face91195 Aug 19 '22

So yeah, it’s really a spell

!remindme 1 month

So I can do epic trolling

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u/fundieweallfact Aug 19 '22

!givemeamilliondollars

u lied to me

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u/SadCoyote3998 Aug 19 '22

!remindme 20 hours

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u/realt4real Aug 18 '22

!remindme 18 years

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u/ladinliban45 Aug 18 '22

!remindme 18 years

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u/Duck-in-a-suit Aug 18 '22

Come back in 10 years.

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u/stenchosaur Aug 18 '22

I have 2 daughters and it's definitely tough. You wanna provide the best life for them, but then you see them acting like spoiled brats and it makes you question everything. Maybe a certain amount of struggle is necessary for growth, and by shielding them from struggles are we doing them a disservice by raising them to be weak? That said, I'd rather have slightly spoiled kids who can keep their innocence by not facing certain traumas, and I can still expose them to struggles we've shielded them from by getting them involved in giving back to our community. Good luck on your journey and sleep now cause you're gonna be real tired for a couple years to come

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22 edited 8d ago

[deleted]

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u/stenchosaur Aug 18 '22

An excellent point that I'm gonna try to remember while I'm taking deep breaths in the heat of the moment

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u/knightsofgel Aug 18 '22

A lot of kids and teens aren’t selfish though

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u/commie-hunter9000 Aug 18 '22

Yes they are dawg. Children can be borderline sociopathic at times

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u/ItzFlair Aug 18 '22

He said a lot of kids aren’t. Meaning that some are but most aren’t which is arguable but I’d say it’s more lenient to most kids are selfish and some aren’t

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u/jacobward7 Aug 18 '22

I think the important thing is trying to teach some perspective by traveling and exposing them to people and places that are out of the norm. Such as a big city if you live in the country, or a small town/countryside if you are from the city. Other countries if you can, for them to see how others live.

They can't help being privileged but they will be better people if they can acknowledge that they are.

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u/Dividedthought Aug 18 '22

The idea is to shield them from trauma, not consequences. My parents failed at this and it led to quite the reality check in high school

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u/Individual_General41 Aug 18 '22

Another thing to remember is that they will face new struggles you never had to, and growth will come from that. It will just look very different from how it happened for you.

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u/Wonderful_Mud_420 Aug 19 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

Put them in sports or some non physical competitive activity. Real stress and hard work but little of the trauma.

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u/thesaunaroom Aug 18 '22

You can still expose them to the value of hard work without them struggle. Be there for help when they need it so that they are provided with basic necessities but anything more than that they gotta work for it.

That’s what my parents did. They were dirt poor growing up and they made it far, not rich but upper middle class. I was never really struggle financially growing up but I didn’t have fancy stuff like other kids. They helped me when I was struggle to pay bills but that’s it. Anything more than that I want I gotta work for it. They make sure I survive and if I want all the stuff that they got, the cars, fancy dinner, name brand clothes, vacation,… I gotta earn all that.

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u/mushy_friend Aug 18 '22

I feel this. My parents struggled a lot when younger but raised us shielded from all that, and while I wouldn't say we're too spoiled (it's relative, since we've been lucky enough to not want for anything), I do think I grew up weak as a result (my siblings though not so much). I had a lot of struggles early in adulthood I wasn't best equipped for

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u/FrittenFritz Aug 18 '22

I'm sure you have good intentions, but promises like this always reminds me of this. I can't help it.

https://imgur.com/a/PTY28ve

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u/buhbeespatiogarden Aug 18 '22

I think about this all the time as a parent.

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u/SidewaysFancyPrance Aug 18 '22

It's tough, not that you want them to struggle just because you did, but because everyone needs to struggle to some degree or else they are likely to become spoiled/lazy/rude adults who have never had to leave their comfort zones. So you want to protect them from things but need to allow them to struggle and fail sometimes (just make sure you are there for support/guidance).

Parenting well is hard.

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u/mxler Aug 18 '22

I'm not defending the boomer mentality, but they're not completely wrong. Struggle really does build character. But don't worry, because the way things are going (largely thanks to the boomers), unless you're rich your kids will endure plenty of struggle in their lifetimes.

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u/Aniakchak Aug 18 '22

The struggle should not come from the household though. That's supposed to be the safe place. Kids will face enough struggle in the real world, if the parents do not act overprotective

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u/Whothefuckshatinmybr Aug 18 '22

"there's no milk" "better put water on that shit"

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u/shanghairolls99 Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

My mom about how i suffered when my dad and her separated: I suffered more than you! So what if you tried to commit suicide multiple times and had to go to therapy and hid it from us, thats you fault you cant cope up, because something is wrong with you! Its not our fault that you have trauma! Where were you when i needed you?! You left me!

Thats verbatim. I was 19yrs old fresh out college and just got accepted on my 1st job the day she decided to went home to her family in the county where there's no job opportunity for me.

Im 35 now and that conversation happened 3 months ago, they separated 2008.

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u/rinnegone Aug 18 '22

i feel like i could have written this exact thing down. especially the part where she denies any involvement with your trauma. my mom refuses to believe that her abusive treatment, surprise surprise, traumatized me. she denies that i have any trauma at all. sometimes i wish we had a normal parental relationship but chances of her ever making a change are incredibly slim since it would require her to admit that she’s in the wrong. sorry that you had a mother like this as well

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u/whogomz Aug 18 '22

It’s more about appropriating the circumstances and not be a spoiled fack.

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u/BrownBearinCA Aug 18 '22

my parents use to say that, i saw a photo album, they had family reunions, got help buying a car and had real vacations

we got none of that, life was way harder thanks to those two fucking junkies

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u/hellyeahimsad Aug 18 '22

A coworker of mine said that "he didn't get any handouts, he got where he is by himself" and then casually one day told me that when he and his wife first got married they were looking to rent a place and an uncle just told them "you can live in this house I own, and save whatever money you would've used for rent to eventually buy your own place" and lo and behold he did. Except he still was a little short when he wanted to buy a house, so he went to the bank to ask for a loan. On his way there he ran into his father in law, who told them they could borrow the money from him instead. EXCEPT when he finally got around to having enough money to pay him back, his godfather wouldn't take it and just let him keep it.

But I guess I should just work harder until my relatives provide me with a big enough safety net

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u/Terrafire123 Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

So the guy has literally never paid rent or mortgage in his life, and his Father-in-law paid for half his house?

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22

Tbf I think the FIL “loaned” him some of the money but the majority of it was paid for by the son in law

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u/coolpeepz Aug 18 '22

If we judge him for receiving gifts, we’re just as bad as the boomers. But we sure can judge him for pretending like he didn’t.

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u/hellyeahimsad Aug 18 '22

I'm not judging him, I wish this was the case for everyone and instead of capitalism we could rely on our friends and relatives. The problem comes cause he doesn't recognize this and thinks it was all of his doing. This conversation first started cause I said I was getting a credit card and he said he doesn't have one "because I don't need one. If I can buy something, I buy it, it I can't, I don't". And somehow twisted this reliance on credit as the cause for my generation's (I'm 24) unstable financial situation

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u/Riley39191 Aug 18 '22

I’m not judging him for receiving gifts, I’m judging him for being a hypocrite

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u/Marcusafrenz Aug 18 '22

Can't judge him for the hand he was dealt but I sure as shit will judge him for how he acts at the table with it.

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u/thatweirdkid1001 Aug 18 '22

This is like my old boss. He's a literal boomer that always talks about how hard he's worked for everything he's had whole simultaneously telling you it was all literally just handed to him.

This man has been all over the world and barely paid for any of it. He's owned fishing boats that were gifted to him hell the shop he owns that I worked for was given to him completely free.

It's like his luck stat is maxed out with no wisdom at all

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u/PranksterLe1 Aug 18 '22

Damn man, I'm sorry. As an addict attempting to be in recovery, I am so happy that I never accidentally brought a life into that super fucked up world...I'm terrified to even think about ever being healthy enough to think I can have a child, because I know what's potentially always around the corner for me...

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u/BrownBearinCA Aug 18 '22

man i'm sorry to hear you're going through that, i know its insanely hard, my dad just couldn't give it up and ended up overdosing on heroin, good old mom just walked out on "her" family did heroin till she couldn't anymore.

good luck on fighting that demon, i know its hard.

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u/PranksterLe1 Aug 18 '22

Thank you...people really just don't have much compassion or understanding, until they go through it with a loved one and either come through the other side together or alone, then they understand. It takes a special kind of person to not let your situation cause you to look down on every person struggling with addiction and offer a few kind words of encouragement still. I appreciate it player. Best of luck.

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u/gabi1234511 Aug 18 '22

Then they start telling you how are you should be grateful they’re not beating you like their parents did to them and how they had to walk through a mountain to go to school

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u/ElReyDelMund0 Aug 18 '22

Uphill, BOTH ways. Through snow storms. Fighting off jaguars. And gang members.

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u/Scoopie me too thanks Aug 18 '22

dont forget they never had shoes.

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u/ElReyDelMund0 Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

Barefoot through fields of glass and volcanic ash lol.

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u/jimlt Aug 18 '22

And balrogs.

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u/Addictive_SODA Aug 19 '22

The jaguars are also gang members or so my parents tell me

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u/kenjhunter Aug 18 '22

Lmao 30 years from now them kids gonna brag to their kids about how they have to wear bullet proof vest to school and have constant fear for their life just sitting in class, god bless America

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u/Growtohealwhole Aug 18 '22

I'm in my mid-late 20s and I've already had to explain to my grandma the actual fear that students feel and that my husband now feels as somone who works in a school. This was after one of the last few shootings where I actually broke down watching the coverage. I felt I could have handled the situation better than the police did, I think any American student could have, I felt let down. She didn't seem to understand that we went through trainings every year and that as students we had to "educated ourselves" as to what could save our lives (what can block doors and jam them up the best, how to hide, how to stop bleeding with socks or whatever is on hand, etc). When I was done explaining she looked horrified and sad. She was especially sad because I'm an adult now and I was basically reliving the trauma that I experienced being in school when sandyhook happened while sitting at her kitchen table in tears. Even though I wasn't in that district it was still clearly very traumatic and impactful and that pain and fear surfaces everytime it happens again. So maybe we haven't gotten to the point that we look back on it and speak about it like they do "hills both ways", but massive and deadly school shootings have been a problem long enough that there are already adults like me who are still clearly very traumatized by their experiences feeling helpless in school. Idk if we will be speaking of this stuff fondly in 30 years, but yeah, there are already adults who have lived through that and now will have to explain it to their kids because nothing was ever done to stop the problem.

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u/verygoodchoices Aug 18 '22

Man it's mind boggling how much has changed in a single generation. Half a generation.

I graduated high school in 2003 and while Columbine was huge, it was seen as such an incredible anomaly. We never had active shooter drills.

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u/Growtohealwhole Aug 18 '22

I graduated highschool in 2014. So just 10 years or so difference. Active shooter drills were constant throughout high-school and college for me. My husband is a professional who works in a preschool now and it's constantly on his mind too, there is always the fear in the back of his head.

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22

No shit. I never had to worry about guns in school, metal detectors just to walk in school, clear backpacks, active shooter drills, bulletproof backpacks, etc.

It’s ridiculous how much the gun nuts expect everyone else in society to adjust to constant exposure to weapons of war due to their misinterpretation of the Second Amendment.

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u/nivenfan Aug 18 '22 Silver

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u/AutomaticVegetables Aug 18 '22

get rid of protect and serve. call it obey and survive like gtav

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u/courtj3ster Aug 18 '22

Protect and serve is merely P.R. It's not in their job description.

That's not to say there aren't plenty of police officers who do view that as their job, but expecting that to be their goal is often going to lead to disappointment at best, and tragedy at worst.

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u/Reddituser34802 Aug 18 '22

They should take it off their patrol cars then.

It’s false advertising.

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u/courtj3ster Aug 18 '22

I mean... I think "P.R." kind of covered that.... but yeah, they should.

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u/Lexi_T_Cat Aug 18 '22

I prefer: to destroy and collect.

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u/kerevizmlg Aug 18 '22

The fuck do they do then ?

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u/Life-Opportunity-227 Aug 18 '22

enforce property laws, mostly

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

Society is far more dangerous with weapons of war that can cause mass casualties easily available to anyone who wants one, two, or twenty of them. Other countries don’t have the same problem as the US with school shootings. That’s because other countries limit the purchase of guns.

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u/NaSk1 Aug 18 '22

Also not having rampant poverty and mental health issues helps a ton with lowering gun violence.

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22

Plenty of other countries have poverty and mental health issues without all the gun violence. The difference with us is the easy access to guns.

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u/LightlyStep Aug 18 '22

How do Americans amend the Constitution?

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u/nivenfan Aug 18 '22

An amendment may be proposed by a two-thirds vote of both Houses of Congress, or, if two-thirds of the States request one, by a convention called for that purpose. The amendment must then be ratified by three-fourths of the State legislatures, or three-fourths of conventions called in each State for ratification.

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u/iThatIsMe Aug 18 '22

This article doesn't mean "everyone needs guns" though.

It highlights why we need police reform and gun control.

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u/europeofficial Aug 18 '22

Not American but how are gun owners responsible for this when school shootings weren't a thing before while there were always tons of guns in America? I'm from a country with strict gun laws so just curious.

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u/Suspicious-Fun-6943 Aug 18 '22

Actually school shootings have been a thing in America for about 100 years now

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u/ALLNEWstratuponavon Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

Yep. 24/7 news and social media just brings more attention to it.

Random shootings at scale are relatively more recent (i.e. last 25 years or so), but shootings in public places in general? Often with bystanders as victims? Been a things for decades.

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u/idiotic_melodrama Aug 18 '22

Guns aren’t responsible and aren’t even the biggest killer in America. The real problem is wealth inequality and the shittiest healthcare system possible.

However, the people who want guns for everyone also oppose solutions to the real problems. Since we can’t get universal healthcare, strong social safety nets, or higher taxes in the rich, we need to do something. It’s much easier to implement stronger gun control than it is to build the multifaceted solution to the real problem.

Personally, I don’t gun control is a workable solution. I don’t think it’ll fix anything and I think it’ll make police brutality against minorities even worse. But, the efforts to actual fix the real problems haven’t stopped. We’re still trying to implement real solutions.

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u/ALLNEWstratuponavon Aug 18 '22

Metal detectors have been a thing since at least the 90s in city schools. It just depends on where you grew up.

I didn't have them out in the burbs, but a couple counties over, they did.

And we still had a couple run ins with mass shootings in the area.

We had the dogs come through every now and then though.

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u/MiZrY1O1 Aug 18 '22

Yup. To get into my middle school, we had to walk through a metal detector, then spread our arms and legs to have a metal detector wand waved all over us.

Early 90's L.A., good times.

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u/Rongo_ Aug 18 '22

U love america is the vibe i get

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/BargainBarnacles Aug 18 '22

"... Oh, we used to dream of livin' in a corridor! Would ha' been a palace to us. We used to live in an old water tank on a rubbish tip. We got woke up every morning by having a load of rotting fish dumped all over us! House? Huh

FOURTH YORKSHIREMAN: Well, when I say 'house' it was only a hole in the ground covered by a sheet of tarpaulin, but it was a house to us

SECOND YORKSHIREMAN: We were evicted from our 'ole in the ground; we 'ad to go and live in a lake

THIRD YORKSHIREMAN: You were lucky to have a lake! There were a hundred and fifty of us living in t' shoebox in t' middle o' road

FIRST YORKSHIREMAN: Cardboard box?

THIRD YORKSHIREMAN: Aye

FIRST YORKSHIREMAN: You were lucky. We lived for three months in a paper bag in a septic tank. We used to have to get up at six in the morning, clean the paper bag, eat a crust of stale bread, go to work down t' mill, fourteen hours a day, week-in week-out, for sixpence a week, and when we got home our Dad would thrash us to sleep wi' his belt..." - https://genius.com/Monty-python-four-yorkshiremen-live-lyrics

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u/aRandomFox-I Aug 18 '22

They start telling you how you should be grateful they didn't abandon you on the roadside along the freeway, because what kind of sick psychopath would even think of doing such a thing to their kids, let alone using it as a threat.

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u/tony1449 Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

GenZ has 86% less purchasing power than Boomers did at the same age.

Said another way: Gen Z has 14% of the purchasing power that boomers did when they were kids.

It's not an easier life.

https://www.consumeraffairs.com/finance/comparing-the-costs-of-generations.html

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u/AspiringChildProdigy Aug 18 '22

Obviously, they should stop eating avocado toast and spend more time pulling on those bootstraps!!!

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u/Can-ta-loupe Aug 18 '22

But 100-86=14

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u/Jmods_wont_reply Aug 18 '22

GenZ has 148% less public education funding than Boomers did at the same age.

Said another way: Gen Z has -50000% of the public education funding that boomers did when they were kids.

I do not understand how percentages work because of it. It's not an easier life.

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u/idiotic_melodrama Aug 18 '22

That’s not percentages work. 2 is 33% of 6. However, 6 is 200% more than 2.

This is elementary level math. America’s school system is a failure.

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u/tony1449 Aug 18 '22

Whoops typo 😅

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u/Acriam Aug 18 '22

Up hill, through the snow, bare footed, with one leg, while working and making 10 cents an hour.

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u/nucularscientiesta Aug 18 '22

Wait you guys didn't get beat as kids ?

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u/cerebralkrap Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

Uh my parents beat me. At least they didn’t tell me how their pos parents beat them, imagine the irony?

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u/nephelokokkygia actually me irl Aug 18 '22

I got beat by my dad and then told I was lucky I wasn't being beat as bad as he'd been. ¯_(ツ)_/¯

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u/lanayajr Aug 18 '22

I am first generation Mexican-American millenial. I grew up with a "hard" life compared to some Americans but my life was still made immensely easier because I was born in America. There's still challenges and obstacles I faced growing up but nothing compared to what my father had to go through to get to America and then survive here with nothing. My father is by no means perfect but I have immense respect for him and what he sacrificed for his family.

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u/Melyssa1023 Aug 18 '22

If you had a dollar for every time you heard "N'ombre mijo, allá en mi pueblo/rancho...", which Tesla Model would you buy? 😂

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u/lanayajr Aug 18 '22

Hah! funny thing is, I own a Tesla model 3 lol. Yea, the "cuando yo era nino" stories are endless 😆

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u/waddlekins Aug 18 '22

resentment

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u/MegabitMegs Aug 18 '22

Yeah that’s some unhealed generational trauma they’re taking out on their kids

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u/Beepboop_Addition Aug 18 '22

This is the truest comment yet is severly undervoted

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u/Civil-Ad-7957 Aug 18 '22

😮 ✨realization unlocked✨

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u/Lazarus_Octern Aug 18 '22

back in my day we had to climb mount everest to go to school

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u/FatPuppy1996 Aug 18 '22

“Back in my day, we walked 10 miles in the heatwave to school while struggling to walk in the snow”

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u/TheGoldenPotato69 Aug 18 '22

Back in my day, we had to walk up the hill both ways to and from school

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u/MinimalPerfection Aug 18 '22

"Back in my day, we had to swim across the atlantic to get to school and if we wanted to eat lunch, we had to fight two lions for it"

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u/Cole_Chur Aug 18 '22

"you were lucky, I had to cross between German and British trench lines at the Somme during the first world war to attend my school"

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u/Thalesium Aug 18 '22

💪 Child, I know it's hard to get out of the bed and go outside at the local bakery to buy some bread, but together we can do this. Put your shoes on and let's go outside for a walk, and don't forget your phone you may need it.

🤡 You're so lazy! Back in my day we had to walk everywhere because we didn't even had money for the bus, Actually we didn't had any bus, and we had to buy the bread no matter what it cost or we could starve, because we were poor as fuck, and now you're complaining "hurr durr I don't wanna go outside". Ah so that's the life you want huh? A lazy life where you live under my roof and do everything you want, eat all the food, play videogames, sleep all you want, don't pay the bills, and when I ask one small easy favor, you immediately refuse because it's too hard, YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT'S HARD WORK BECAUSE YOU STAY ON THAT PHONE ALL DAY LONG, NOW GO OUTSIDE AND BUY SOME BREAD!

Question: Which parent did life gave to you?

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u/Teminite2 Aug 18 '22

I got the one that says "bakery? Well you might as well ask your dad to get you bread. You ever thought how I feel?"

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u/Ironwall1 Aug 18 '22

First one and I'm so thankful for it but I know some people are not as lucky and I'm incredibly sorry for them. I hope they can be better parents to their kids than their parents were to them.

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u/PartyDanimal Aug 18 '22

One slightly toned down version of each. "I know you're not feeling well but we're late and need to go," and "I don't know what's wrong with the younger generations; nobody wants to do anything."

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u/ItsLegendaryRedmen Aug 18 '22

Why is the second one so accurate lol

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u/GayAsHell0220 Aug 18 '22

The older I get the more I realize just how incredibly lucky I am. My parents absolutely were (and still are) the former kind. They've made plenty of mistakes raising a disabled child but overall they really succeded in never ever belittling my issues and worries.

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u/Hubblenobbin Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

The first one. Then every few weeks/months the second one for two weeks, out of fuckin nowhere. Makes it feel like the second is constantly looming in the background and you can never trust the first. Yeah, fucked me up pretty good.

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u/DoCardinal Aug 18 '22

I got the one where it was my responsibility to think about going to get the bread (grocery) since I was 11. And She was giving me enough money to go do the grocery. No yelling, no blaming, but no letting me complain neither. There was no point in complaining or having feelings.

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u/PuzzleheadedBye Aug 18 '22

Mine would just sigh really loudly then act disgusted with me lol

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u/Magma151 knows that all things pass Aug 18 '22

My parents gave me the "were letting you drive this car that we own for your own daily use on the condition that you pull your weight by occasionally running some errands for us, keeping your grades up, and not getting into trouble" option.

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u/Dirtycurta Aug 18 '22

How many millennials think their lives are easier than their boomer parents?

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u/DedFluff Aug 18 '22

If I got a penny for every time a boomer told me to work harder to afford a house...I'd still not be able to get one. (Because they broke the market, duh) But it might be enough for a life time supply of avocado toasts.

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u/adhominem_expert Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

When a boomer tells me why I can’t afford a house I remind them they they could buy their first for like $12,000.

Also I could totally get a house right now I just don’t want to adjust my spending habits in the meantime.

I’ll wait till my parents croak and sell their house and buy mine.

Executor of the estate baby!

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u/NectarineNo8425 Aug 18 '22

When a boomer tells me why I can’t afford a house I remind them they they could buy their first for like $12,000.

And then they counter, "the price of gas was 85 cents per gallon. A loaf of bread of 50 cents. The price of everything went up. We had to work very hard to save every penny to afford a house."

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u/adhominem_expert Aug 18 '22

Yeah how is that a counter? Them explaining that the costs of all necessities were lower as well?

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u/NectarineNo8425 Aug 18 '22

That's the point. It's not a counter but they insist that it is a counter 🤣

They view it as equivalent. Houses costing $12,000 and gas costing 85 cents/gal back then it the equivalent of houses costing $650,000 and gas costing $5.60/gal today. 🤣

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u/FluidReprise Aug 18 '22

How many 70+ year olds do you regularly talk to? You work in a nursing home or something?

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u/Bon-Bon-Assassino Aug 18 '22

I think my life is pretty easy. I don't have any kids, my parents had 6. No internet back in their day. That's huge.

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u/the_ranch_gal Aug 18 '22

Mine definitely

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22

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u/Longjumping_Ship_756 Aug 18 '22

Please find help, it's never too late

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u/i_hate_fanboys Aug 18 '22

Mine too, especially my dad’s

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u/KingKaos420- Aug 18 '22

Easier, but I’m pretty sure I’m going to end up with more debt and less property than them.

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u/innocentusername1984 Aug 18 '22

In some ways it is. In some ways it isn't.

I feel like emotionally things are easier. My parents were quite emotionally aggressive with me and sometimes violent and spanking was definitely a thing. However their parents were borderline psychopaths and that was kind of normal for ww2 generation.

They've got access to better job prospects and obviously the housing market has left them soooo much better off. I'm on the wealthier side of millennials and what I had to do to get a house is about 10 times what my parents did. Oh and their pensions are super generous. It'll make people cry seeing what is going into my fathers and mothers account every month because they worked middle of the road jobs for the government. Its way more than even the average income and we ain't getting that when we're older unless we saved it ourselves.

But hey, they'll die soon and I'll inherit a bunch of that wealth?

Maybe. Mother has dementia and her care home bills will eat through every penny of inheritance if she lives 10 years. Which she may.

So what do millenials have? Well we grew up with the Internet, cool technology and games. A lot of stuff for us is cheaper for instance eating out tvs. As I said before my parents were bustards at times but better than what they themselves have.

Things are now going to go two ways. This world is going to collapse and we see the last of the good times. Or as some have predicted, technology does save us and we get to be the generation that over sees saving the planet.

I dunno I really can't tell if I want to be born in the luckiest generation economically. The generation that might oversee the dawning of a new era or be the last one to enjoy anything before apocalypse. Or the generation that either has to grow up with the apocalypse or a new green progressive world.

I already feel my kids have it way better than I did but maybe every parent feels that way.

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u/Girlsontheinternet Aug 18 '22

My dad fought in the Yugoslavian war so my life in Canada is much easier. They didn't really get the benefit of boomer bucks because they were immigrants. Their struggle made me very resourceful and now I have a boring good job that pays well. My boyfriend's parents didn't fight in the war but they definitely escaped communism in the same country so he was equally resourceful. They're better off than my parents but they still had to work hard from the bottom to get there. They'd be much more ahead if they were born in Canada for sure.

Between me and my boyfriend, we will probably have a good life that will be somewhat similar to many boomers. Maybe a much higher mortgage, but we're also much more well educated than most boomers were so we won't fall into the traps of timeshares, tithing, ponzi schemes and MLMs.

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u/GamingTaylor Aug 18 '22

I feel like the big problem is that boomers continue to work later in life. It’s easier for them to get a good job because they have decades of experience.

Meanwhile… millennials are trapped in a cycle of accepting dead end entry level jobs and/or getting in massive student debt while not being able to afford more than an apartment…which equates to no savings and no equity…

Most boomers paid less than $250k for their homes 10 years ago that are now worth double if not triple.

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u/IguanaTabarnak Aug 18 '22

Most boomers paid less than $100k for their homes 30 or 40 years ago and those homes have increased tenfold in value. Now they are selling those homes to corporations and living out their retirement in rentals or small condos on the back of that value increase to ensure that they pass none of that capital down to the next generation.

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u/Romney_in_Acctg Aug 18 '22

Mine definitely is but my parents worked construction and I'm an accountant. I make way more money adjusted for inflation than my parents ever did. But then again I'm aware that anecdote doesn't equal data.

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u/Dick_Thumbs Aug 18 '22

Mine is 100%

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u/Turd_Gurgle Aug 18 '22

My mom was born in 61 and my dad in 65 and I can say I had a much better life than my dad. He didn't have plumbing until he was 24. Shat in a outhouse his whole childhood and drank from a well. Mom had better opportunities though.

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u/Indystick Aug 18 '22

Not easier, better.

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u/AlcoholicCocoa Aug 18 '22

Fun thing: getting up away from the bottom is not solving trauma from being poor. In fact it can cause cracks in your relationship with your children as you low-key are envious of what they have that you didn't at the age.

Getting away from being poor is going to leave marks on you. I, for example, cannot decline to get something second hand if I really have to have it, like a bureau chair. I can easily afford a new and decent one but I don't buy one. It's a trauma response from being tight on mone for 25 years of my life

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u/Swinship Aug 18 '22

I haven't really ever had money in large supply. Every Purchase feels like agony, I need it or I want it and its a step in a nicer direction but the conflicted voices in my head wont shut up!. I think I know what you mean

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u/AlcoholicCocoa Aug 18 '22

Yeah that "do I want it or do I need it" is something else that's constantly nagging

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u/Swinship Aug 18 '22

truly, "a new couch might be nice to have, it would elevate my home" but like i have these old chairs that are perfectly serviceable and the money might be better spent..."

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u/AlcoholicCocoa Aug 18 '22

Ugh, YES! This so much

"You wasted 10 bucks on sweets and snacks. That are ten bucks gone for NOTHING"

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u/Swinship Aug 18 '22

don't even get me started. "ugh this game is $5 that's a lot, yeah I might only play it for 100 hours, but $5. OOooo ill spend $12 on this smoothie heck yeah"

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u/Warthog-Designer Aug 18 '22

“BACK IN MY DAY-“ “If you want me to live like you did then stop doing what YOUR parents didn’t do”

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u/Existing_Air5930 Aug 18 '22

Only bad parents behave like this. My parents ‘wanted me to succeed’ and when I did (without following THEIR suggestions) they behaved like this. My partners parents actually want things to be easier for him. They’ve been incredibly supportive and he is a much healthier/less traumatized person than I could ever be for it.

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u/gloriamors3 Aug 18 '22

This! Spend time with them as much as you can. Healthy parents create healthy children. Give them the least amount of trauma as possible. Kids that go through home trauma suffer all through their lives. That doesn't mean things, or spoiling. It means connectedness, love, and mirroring to them that they are worthy of a good life and sharing it with good people.

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u/Kopke2525 team waterguy12 Aug 18 '22

I didn't work this just so you can have an easier life!

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u/Future_Gain_7549 Aug 18 '22

Only Boomers can buy an 80" TV and call everyone who uses it lazy.

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u/ayotui Aug 18 '22

Parents don't want you to live an easy life. They want you to work just as hard as they did but from a higher starting point so that your children can continue the cycle from an even higher starting point than you again.

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u/noobvin Aug 18 '22

Honestly I want my daughter to have it easier. I want her to do only the jobs that she loves. I didn’t always do that. I made a lot of mistakes and had to scrap to get to where I am. I don’t want that for her. Of course a good work ethic is great and she has that, but what I want for her is more freedom.

I know what you’re saying though. It’s not that you’re wrong, I just know I do want everything to come to her easily. I might feel differently if her character isn’t what it is. In 19 years and including college, she’s never gotten less than an A for a grade. We’re not high pressure either. That’s just the way she is. Such a smart, funny, wonderful person.

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u/Vindemiatrix12 Aug 18 '22

My parents resent me for having an easier life and wanting to enjoy it, so I feel guilty all the time

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u/FloppieTheBanjoClown Aug 18 '22

I just want my kids to understand that their lives are easier, and that a lot of people don't have it that easy.

I grew up in a rough town. Like, ranked in the top ten most violent small towns in Texas rough. The things I saw growing up were normal to me, and it wasn't until my mid-20s that I realized that my experience wasn't the norm. Young people tend to think that what is normal to them is (or should be) normal to everyone.

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u/Phoebus_Apollon Aug 18 '22

Thank the heavens that my parents haven't worked hard and now I have harder life than my parents

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u/Content_Flounder4141 Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 18 '22

Quick word to the wise.

Parents don't work hard to give their kids an easier life. They work hard to give the kids a better life. They expect the kids to put the same effort into Life to make it that much better for the next gen and so on. What they absolutely don't want, is for the kids to just take it easy and eat up all the advantage/momentum that was gained by hard work and sacrifice.

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u/[deleted] Aug 18 '22 edited 8d ago

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u/One_Statistician1124 Aug 18 '22

I'm just looking for a genuine thank you every now and then. Not to just expect to go to the trampoline park every weekend and cry when you don't get to.

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u/FIESTYgummyBEAR Aug 18 '22

Damn lol. How olds the kid? 😆

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u/Lord-Liberty Aug 18 '22

It's well established that both millenials and Gen Z are living worse lives than their predecessors.

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u/Dracoknight256 Aug 18 '22

That's older generations. For my parents it was:

Parent: works harder for kids to have an easier life.

Economy: hahahaha actually, your work is worth less and less every year so your kids life gets harder and harder.

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u/Bdriver_1976 Aug 18 '22

Damn kids now a days. (Notice how it's the generation responsible for the kids that complain about them)

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u/Dark___Reaper Aug 18 '22

Honestly my family got relatively richer while I was in middle school. So i remember the hard times as well. Makes me appreciate the stuff we have currently.

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u/TheBluePanda Aug 18 '22

It’s not easier now, it’s harder.

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u/nefffffffffff Aug 18 '22

Turns out parents are more self centered than they care to admit

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u/tungy5 Aug 18 '22

Parents work harder to provide more opportunities than they had, not make it easier. They look at kids like that because the opportunities are not taken advantage of when they come up.

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u/Mendo56 Aug 18 '22

Good ol crab bucket

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u/sanngetal420 Aug 18 '22

This is some selfish boomer level shit right here. I personally want my kids to do better than me.

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u/Think-Highlight7779 Aug 18 '22

Lmao 30 years from now them kids gonna brag to their kids about how they have to wear bullet proof vest to school and have constant fear for their life just sitting in class, god bless America

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u/Danne200 Aug 18 '22

Parents run away to sweden go give their kids a good life.

Their kids: deal drugs, form gangs and kill eachother.

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u/topwrastler Aug 18 '22

They went through a little form of trauma bonding ya know. If they went through it why shouldn’t you have too.

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u/ins0mnyteq Aug 18 '22

I stopped this trend, I worked lazily and barely got by so my kids understand that they have to also just get by to get by. A new paradigm of parenting.......I also ask to borrow money from them occasionally just so they know it's a possibility that they may have to pay my light bill so they save money once in a while

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u/yourfreekindad Aug 18 '22

parents when their kids grow up the way they raised them to be:

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u/NotTheLimes Aug 18 '22

That meme was last relevant maybe 30 years ago. Nowadays we can't buy homes like our parents did.

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u/Saeryf Aug 19 '22

See also: "And I took that personally" meme.

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u/MissMaamToYou Aug 19 '22

I don’t get upset for them not suffering… I get upset about the ungrateful-ness

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u/Kiron00 Aug 19 '22

Yeah I’m definitely having a worse life than my parents did.

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u/NakiSaki30010 Aug 19 '22

Wep, aint planning no kids for myself, just cats and chill all day everyday, till I die

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u/SeperateCross Aug 21 '22

I'm gonna to teach my daughter to appreciate what she has not make her feel guilty about it.

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u/EntertainerMassive72 Aug 18 '22

We want our kids to live an easier life. That's why we work so hard. We know the struggles. We want to prevent them for our children. At the same time, over 18 years we wait. For a heartfelt "thank you for struggling so I don't have to Dad." Of course we didn't learn how to be truly thankful until we see how we didn't have to struggle now. So I continue. Waiting for that precious moment she understands how much I went through so she never has to.

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u/noobvin Aug 18 '22

My thanks is seeing my daughter’s success. That’s all I need. I don’t even want her to think about what I did, but live her life fully and be happy. That’s the greatest reward I can think of. Eventually when she has her own kids… which is a an “if” really, she might have a different perspective, but I don’t mind if she never says anything. She might in her own way through actions.

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u/TheErectDongdreSh0w Aug 18 '22 edited Aug 19 '22

If you have a kid because you're waiting for the day they say thank you, that's a pretty shitty reason to have a kid.

Having a kid shouldn't be about you.

:edit: this wasn't a bad parent roll call, everyone lol

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u/Cyberic9 Aug 18 '22

Reddit reading comprehension challenge (impossible)

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u/EntertainerMassive72 Aug 18 '22

The meme would imply the person with his head cocked would give the impression he's waiting for the other person to thank you. I'm not a parent waiting for a thank you. But I am a human parent who will do anything for my child. I do hope she thanks me truly in the future. Not why I'm a parent tho.

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u/PlainclothesmanBaley Aug 18 '22

I don't think it's fair to say their reason for having a kid is to get a thank you. It's pretty reasonable to look forward to the day when your child will realise what you've done for them, as often happens once they enter their twenties and get a fuller perspective on how life works.

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u/exhaustedcheese Aug 18 '22

Yeah I agree. Theyre not having a kid for a thank you haha

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